Theories Of Childhood Learning

794 Words 4 Pages
Contemporary perspectives of learning and development have had a strong influential factor on how we perceive childhood today. However, the image of child cannot be easily defined. It encompasses the broad spectrums of age, cognitive, physical and emotional development, environment and the political parameters that sanction child to adult transitions. (James. A. & James, A. 2008 ) Also Complicating this is the notion by Sorin and Galloway(2006) that childhood is socially and culturally constructed and suited to differing adult ideologies that are imposed upon children. Further adding to these concepts is the theories of childhood learning and development and their complexities. These complexities lie in the attachment to evolution, biology …show more content…
The aim of the community was to reconstruct society, placing paramount importance on a new style of teaching. Parents viewed their children as innocent and wanted their children to feel safe and secure and learn the importance of a democratic society. This is in direct contrast to the view of children in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Children and childbearing was treated harshly and the child viewed as evil in construct as they were born in the era of original sin (Berk, …show more content…
2000, p.2). Initially the movement started as a community based project where educators, parents and teachers worked together and evolved to what is now a renowned form of innovative education. Malaguzzi’s teaching philosophies stem from the social constructivism theories drawn from Vygotsky, Dewey and Bruner (Edwards, C. P. 2002). Teaching principals for the Reggio approach concentrate on an education that is relationship centric. Malaguzzi (1993) claims that building and nurturing relationships creates meaningful learning experiences. Children are miniature adults and are powerful as they help co construct their learning and development. Children are encouraged to make independent choices, forming and expressing their own ideas and opinions and recognise that they have their own rights. Rather than children with disabilities having special needs, children have special rights and expectantly participate in their group as valuable social members. (Thornton, L., & Brunton, P.

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