Child Savers In The 1800s

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During the 1700s, the problem of children misbehaving became known as the “crimes and conditions of poor children”. By the 1800s, concerned citizens known as “child savers” united to protect the children and work on their behalf. Early in the century, the individuals were focused on establishing separate facilities for the youth; but later they became more focused on the creation of the first juvenile court. At the start of the movement, Black children were always excluded and treated differently. Around about 1819, group of individuals concerned about the poverty level and the predicaments of the youth in New York City formed the Society for the Prevention of Pauperism. Later, the Society for the Prevention of Pauperism became known as the …show more content…
Massachusetts opened its first reform school for boys in 1847 and for girls in 1856. The reformatories and the houses of refuge differed in many ways. Firstly, the smaller buildings that were maintained were utilized and secondly, there was a better level of education being given to the delinquents. Most states outside of the South had reform schools for boys and girls by 1890. Just like the houses of refuge operated, reformatories did the same by excluding Blacks and just sending them to adult jails and prisons. Black youth outnumbered any other delinquents in these facilities and were always subjected to the most brutal form of punishment. It was then in 1873 the first separate reformatory for colored boys opened in Baltimore. The state of Virginia opened its first industrial home for “wayward colored girls” in 1915 and a facility for “wayward boys” in 1920. All of these reformatories were due in efforts of the child …show more content…
The first juvenile court was established in 1899 in Cook County, Illinois; soon after the first was established, juvenile courts rapidly spread all over the country leading to the juvenile justice system. Originated from the ancient legal doctrine of parens patriat (the State as Parent) which declared the King to be the guardian of all his subjects, the courts assumed the right to interfere on account for the youth believed to be in need of help based on life circumstances or the delinquent acts they may have committed. The primary goal was to provide rehabilitation and protective supervision for the children. The courts were supposed to be a place where a child could receive individual attention from someone concerned about their

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