Child Maltreatment

Superior Essays
The Relationship between Child Maltreatment and Emotion Recognition
“Introduction”
“The purpose of this study was to compare the ability to identify the emotional states of others between abused and non-abused children”. (Koizumi, Takagishi, 2014, p.1). The maltreatment of children is an issue that is happening around the world. Maltreatment is considered abuse and neglect; furthermore, maltreatment can be a variety of physical abuse, psychological abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect. As children grow, so does their understanding of how to interpret another’s feelings, as well as their own. Being abuse has an impact on how children are developing their social cognitive abilities. There have been several studies done to look at how the family
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Maltreated children’s adaptive behavior is not typically evaluated when treatment plans are being discussed. Adaptive behavior is important in our daily lives because it is the skills we learn when it comes to communication, daily living skills, and socialization. If maltreated children do not have these basic adaptive skills they will not be able to do things such as self care, handle time management, and rule following behavior. It is concerning that there is little knowledge in their adaptive behavior because if we can understand what abilities they are able to perform than a more suitable intervention can be planned. (Viezel, Lowell, Davis, Castillo …show more content…
The abuse group consisted of 42 children, and the neglect group consisted of 118 children, both groups were placed by foster care. For the control group this study used samples “provided by NCS Pearson, Inc. from the standardization samples of Vineland one and two. Participants were matched on sex, ethnicity, and age.”(Viezel et al 2014 p. 575) Important to note that the data was collected in New York State from children placed in foster care. In order to use the data it was required that there be a clear reason to why they were in foster care. They looked at children between the ages of five and eighteen, and the types of abuse that occurred. An assessment of adaptive behavior skills were a part of the psychological evaluation, and all evaluations were completed between 2003 and 2009. This study used the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, and depending on the year of the evaluation it was either the first or second addition. The behavior scales focused on communication, daily living skills, and socialization. The motor skills portion was not used due to it being designed for children six and under. With children in foster care they wait four to six weeks to give the test. Since the test is given individually and is completed by an adult who knows the child this time frame insures the foster parents have enough time to get to know the child well enough. The test has three

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