Chicken Pox Essay

Good Essays
Do you remember the time when you had chicken pox? How did you feel? Furthermore, did you run bout the house, confused about what you had? Where these are relevant questions, I am sure you have questions about the origin of the varicella zoster virus also known as "chicken pox." After this presentation, you should be capable of, identifying the symptoms of chicken pox. In addition, you should be competent to describe the condition and prescribe the appropriate medical attention to an infected individual. Myths and misconceptions will be identified and discussed as well.
The reason I chose chicken pox as my disease, is because it can be a fun topic to present. Furthermore, there are things that I was not aware of, about chicken pox. While I
…show more content…
When maturity of the virus is reached the spikes allow a way of escape. Next is the (lipid envelope). This is the viruses’ lipid and protein structure that is derived from the host cell membrane, according to William Lucas, WuXi AppTec, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA April 2010. “The capsid and envelope have many roles in viral infection, including virus attachment to cells, entry into cells, release of the capsid contents of the cells, and packaging of newly formed viral particles. The capsid and envelope are responsible for transfer of the viral genetic material from one cell to another. These structures, moreover, determine the stability characteristics of the virus particle, such as resistance to chemical or physical inactivation." Moving on to the (tegument), this is a load of proteins that fill the space that is in between the envelope and the nuclei-capsid. The (nuclei-capsid) is the shell that has the viral nucleic acid enclosed inside. Finally the (double-stranded DNA stranded DNA genome) this is the specific code for the varicella zoster/ herpes virus.
How does the virus affect the organism, organ system or the organ itself? To the side is a figure provided by Google 's images, of how the varicella virus works within the nerve system and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Parvovirus Research Paper

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages

    An important sequence of FPV is a hairpin structure found at the 3’ end of viral DNA. This sequence serves as a primer template for the host cell’s DNA polymerase (4,20). As previously discussed, FPV’s genome contains sequences resembling the TATA box and polyadenylation sites that initiate and terminate transcription by host polymerase. Host cells may also contain an hnRNP A/B protein that reduces the affinity of DNA polymerase to bind to viral DNA, thus reducing its ability to replicate (22). However, not all host cells contain this protein at high enough concentrations to block FPV…

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Viral DNA is recognised by CAS3, a DNA nuclease and ATP-dependent helicase, (Sinkunas et al., 2011) the spacer is processed and the strands inserted. The second stage is Expression. CAS genes, such as CAS3, are expressed and the CRISPR is transcribed as pre-CRISPR RNA (crRNA) Mature crRNA is then derived from the pre-crRNA. The final stage is Interference in which the target is recognised and destroyed by crRNA and CAS proteins. (Rath et al.,…

    • 1701 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Influenza Virus

    • 1669 Words
    • 7 Pages

    This occurs because a protein receptor is recognized by the virus and the virus attaches to the cell. Penetration is when the virus moves through the plasma membrane of the cell it locked onto into the cytoplasm of the cell. This happens during a process known as endocytosis. Endocytosis is the process of a cell taking something in from the environment. Uncoating…

    • 1669 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ebola Virus

    • 2693 Words
    • 11 Pages

    The virus attacks the host by attaching to host receptors using the glycoproteins studded in the envelope and is endocytosed into macrophagosomes. In order to fully penetrate the cytosol, the viral membrane must then fuse with the vesicle membrane, thereby releasing the nucleocapsid into the cytosol. As we already have discussed, the genomic negative sense ssRNA is utilized as a template for the synthesis of monocistronic mRNAs, and, using the host ribosomes and tRNA molecules, the mRNA is translated into viral proteins. As the viral protein levels…

    • 2693 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Uncoating of virus:- Can be blocked by Amantadine e.g in Influenza A 4. Integration of the viral DNA into chromosomal DNA of the host cell: Can be blocked by Fomivisen e.g in Cytomegaloviruv. 5.Template production and RNA or DNA replication (Nucleic acid synthesis) . This Can be blocked by purine,pyrimidine analogs and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. 6. mRNA transcription , processing and translation of mRNA to protein : blocked by Methisazone e.g in Variola 7.…

    • 1313 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Nucleic Acid Contains genetic material, which may be double or single stranded DNA or RNA. This allows for the synthesis of viral proteins. Tail Fibres Allow the virus to attach to host cell and move. Lipid Envelope (Dervied from host cell membrane) Fuses with the host's membrane, allowing the capside and viral genome to enter and infect the host. Capsomere Repeating protein unit, which makes up the protein coat.…

    • 827 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Microbe Hepatitis B virus belongs to a group called, Hepadnaviridae which consists of diseases that contain deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and affect the liver. Hepatitis B is a virus therefore; hepatitis B requires a living host to replicate viral particles. Hepatitis B consists of a nucleic acid core, a protein coat, and a lipid envelope. The hepatitis B virus contains a partially double-stranded DNA within the nucleic acid core because one of the full-length strands is linked to the viral DNA polymerase. The lipid envelope that surrounds the capsid contains glycoprotein spikes which are used to attach to receptors found on the host cell.…

    • 1187 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In this system, CRISPR arrays are transcribed into an RNA molecule (guide RNA) and then processed into CRISPR RNAs (crRNA) to guide Cas9 nuclease activity against specific portions of the DNA or RNA of the pathogen [6]. The activity of the guide RNA, which can bind specifically to a sequence of nucleic acids and target the Cas9 nuclease activity, allows the CRISPR-Cas9 technique to be used to edit the genome of bacteria like Streptococcus thermophilus, Escherichia coli, and also of mammalian cells in a specific way. This way, if we use different guide RNAs, we can target specific regions of the genome and, as a result, target the nuclease activity of Cas9 to edit a desired region of the genome…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Immunodeficiency Virus

    • 1011 Words
    • 4 Pages

    One of the major parts of the Immune System we will be looking at is the CD4 cells. There are four kinds of CD4 cells (TH1, TH2, TH17, and Treg) that are white blood cells that all work to stimulate a response in the Immune System. All CD4 cells are important in stimulating a response from the immune system of other immune cells or systems to prevent and fight off infection by secreting molecules that set off the Immune System (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 2013). Human Immunodeficiency Virus works by affecting the CD4 cells. HIV has seven steps in affecting CD4 cells.…

    • 1011 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Adaptive Immune Response

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The main features of the adaptive immune response is to adapt its response to new invaders and its ability to specifically recognise and remember an invader. B cells are used in the humoral division of the adaptive immune system. Each B cell has a different antigen-binding specificity. Only one B cell is activated per antigen but the activated B cell can differentiate and secrete many antibodies with the same specificity for the original antigen. B cells express specific antigen receptors (immunoglobulin molecules) on their cell surface during their development and, when mature in the bone marrow, secrete soluble immunoglobulins (antibodies) into the extracellular fluids.…

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays