Chemistry Lab Report

1365 Words 6 Pages
The goal of this laboratory project was to identify the unknown compound and thoroughly investigate it to find its physical and chemical properties which reveal the way it might behave. This was done by performing many anion, cation, solubility, and pH tests to help us to determine the identity of our compound. The list of salts in the lab manual made it possible to narrow down the possibilities of our unknown compound. After identifying the compound, the goal was to synthesize the unknown compound. To determine the initial properties of the unknown compound, a qualitative solubility test was performed by mixing five milliliters of water with one gram of the unknown compound. After placing the solution in a test tube, the test tube was studied …show more content…
The total was 1.2 which meant that the compound was a polar ionic bond because of its electronegativity difference. The greater the electronegativity difference, the more ionic the bond is. Next, a pH test was performed by dipping pH paper into the compound that had been mixed with water. It had a pH of 3 which means that it is acidic. Acids “conduct electricity, change blue litmus to red, have a sour taste, react with bases to neutralize their properties, and react with active metals to liberate hydrogen when dissolved in water.”2 As seen in Table 1, a chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and carbon test was performed to find the anion. To test for the cation, as seen in Table 2, a flame test was performed by using a Bunsen burner and blue cobalt glass. Blue cobalt glass is used in a flame test to filter out the yellow flame caused by the contamination of sodium. Initially, the nichrome wire was cleaned in the flame. After putting the compound on the wire and into the flame while using the blue cobalt glass, the flame turned bright orange which indicated a sodium …show more content…
The insolubility of CaOH caused our solution to form a precipitate. Next, we added H2SO4 to our compound which then formed CaSO4 and HCL. CaSO4 and MgCl were both soluble in solution which means that it did not form a precipitate. Next, we added Mg(SO)4 to the compound which then created CaSO4 and MgCl. CaSO4 and MgCl also were both soluble in solution which means that this mixture did not form a precipitate. Next, we added Na2(CO)3 to the compound which then formed CaCO3 and NaCl2. NaCl2 was soluble in water. Although CaCO3 was not soluble in water, there are 3 unpaired non-bonding electrons which are moving freely throughout the solution which is why it did not form a precipitate. Lastly, we added MgCl2 to the compound and the reactants (CaCl2 and MgCl) were both soluble in solution, which means that they did not form a precipitate. A large amount of our lab was performing anion tests to test for precipitates. According to Herman and Schafer, it is important to remember that precipitates are ionic solid products of a reaction and are formed when cations and anions intermix in an aqueous solution.3 Some reactions vary based on temperature or solute

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