Chaucer's Respected Characters In The Canterbury Tales

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Since the beginning of time, man has produced the most unique stories from nearly thin air. Many stories fade into nothingness after a period of time, but some stories are timeless and still are prevalent in media today. A good portion of the most popular stories are based off of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. The stories are so broad and unique that one may not even realize certain stories are inspired by Chaucer. Anything from a noble tale of romance to a dirty bar story could be found within his timeless tales. From reading his prologue and stories it is very easy to see the types of people he respected and could care less about. The people he respected and disliked were mostly very easy to see, judging from how he described specific …show more content…
Those such as the knight were extremely respected; Chaucer being one of the many that held the utmost respect for them. Chaucer viewed the knights as some of the most noble people that deserve the respect they are given. This is obviously shown in the way the Knight in Chaucer’s story is described. In the prologue, Chaucer notes that his character was a very noble and strong man, who was very chivalrous and generous (Chaucer 43 - 78). The Knight also was a very modest man, not overly flaunting his excellent deeds and wealth. Chaucer used very specific details and wording to show that he greatly respected knights and their code of chivalry. However, Chaucer surprisingly did not only conform to respect for the highest ranking people in society. Unlike many, Chaucer was an early, avid feminist. Women were a group of people that Chaucer thought very highly of and believed deserved the best. The character that shows this idea the most was the Wife of Bath. The Wife of Bath is described to be a very strong willed and is thought to be the perfect woman in that time who is in full control of her marriages, of which she has had five (Chaucer 447 – 478 ). Not only is the Wife of Bath shown to be powerful, but many of Chaucer’s stories end with the women getting away from a bad situation perfectly fine. Emily in the Knight’s tale married a man that loved her, Allison in the Miller’s tale was …show more content…
Of everyone in this time, Chaucer was utterly disgusted by the ones no one would have expected: the religious groups. This hatred is surprising for the fact that Chaucer himself was an extremely religious man. However, that was also the reason Chaucer hated them so much. He realized that the church was utterly corrupted, taking bribes and any sorts of payments to overlook certain things and provide specific services. This hatred is shown in the religious characters from the way he describes them, much like the way he made his respect in certain classes prevalent in the representative characters. Characters such as the Pardoner show extremely corrupted attributes. For instance, the Pardoner sells church pardons to people (Chaucer 671 - 685). The Pardoner is a mean and nasty con artist who pockets the money to use on himself and his wants. Characters like the Prioress, however, show less of a disgusted side of Chaucer. Rather, Chaucer is very disappointed in such things as the Prioress’s study of French, rather than the Bible (Chaucer 121 – 126). Chaucer shows that his greatest hope is for the churches to clean themselves up and straighten

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