Charlotte's Web Symbolism

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In E.B. White’s novel Charlotte’s Web, he uses the natural cycle of life and death to highlight his belief that life is cyclical and not fair, so instead of living in fear of death on should enjoy life’s small pleasures. White uses Wilbur’s life span and his interaction with other characters to showcase the fear and joys of living. When Wilbur is born as the runt of the family, he is chosen to be slaughtered, so from the get go Wilbur’s life is shrouded by death. Life and death are already in contestation, but Fern steps in and stops his father from killing Wilbur. Fern questions Mr. Arble by asking, “‘It’s unfair...The pig couldn 't help being born small, could it? If I had been very small at birth, would you have killed me?’” (White 3). …show more content…
Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Lewis artistically creates an alternate realm that is scattered with folklore and mythology ranging from Christian allegory to Greek gods. Some argue that the novel is too heavily based on Christian beliefs, but on the other hand some believe the novel to be a simple fantasy tale. Lewis introduces the four protagonist, Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy as the “Sons of Adam and Daughters of Eve” (Lewis 29). The four characters are human and Lewis blatantly relates them back to Adam and Eve, God’s first human beings. Another core reason to the heavy Christian undertone is the character, Aslan. Lewis designed Aslan, an allegorical representation of Jesus, as one who rules over Narnia, instills fear and respect within all the people. When Mr. Beaver speaks of the great lion, “[the] children felt something jump in [their] inside” (74). When Edmund betrays the people of Narnia, Aslan sacrifices his life to spare him mimicking how Jesus sacrificed himself for the people’s sin. Aslan, mirroring Jesus, is also resurrected. Lewis’ characterization of Aslan is the most obvious evidence of Christian allegory and throughout the novel he subtly relates to other religious …show more content…
One can look at the novel as a simple portal fantasy, in which Lewis creates the characters and world as a whole other universe. We, as readers, are supposed to completely assume that Narnia is an alternative universe with no connection to religion. Lewis, throughout the story, uses Greek and Roman mythology contradicting the heavy religious undertone. Mr. Tumnus, the faun, is taken from Roman mythology. Mr. Tumnus, unlike the classical fauns from the myths, is not an flirtatious half-human half-goat, but instead a civilized being who is friends with Lucy. Lewis takes the faun from Roman mythology and strips it of any preconceived ideas and simply uses it as a mythical character. If we apply what Lewis did the Mr. Tumnus, than we can also assume Aslan, the King of Narnia, is simply a respected ruler not Christ. Not only does he borrow from Roman mythology, Lewis also uses Father Christmas as a character who delivers our heros their weapons for battle. The novel consist of a prophecy, heros, the quest and the victory all pieces to a very simple traditional fantasy

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