Feminist Analysis: The Story Of An Hour, And The Awakening

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Feminist Analysis
Women around the world have been suppressed continuously for their persona, intellect, color, and their gender. In several stories such as The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Story of an Hour, and The Awakening both by Kate Chopin all give the reader an illustration of how men practice patriarchal oppression towards women. The feminist movement in the mid 1800’s, where women strongly opposed a man’s mistreatment, created a movement to confirm a woman’s worth. According to Feminist Analysis Theory, by Donald Hall, feminist’s main focus is to, “explore on the complex ways in which women have been denied social power and the right to various forms of self-expression” (Hall 199). Feminist study the ways in
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Women have strongly felt afflicted by men who have undermined their ability to be independent. This issue is thoroughly asserted in the Feminist Analysis Key Concepts, which says, “Among those women who lived by the rules, so to speak, how did some find fulfillment in what may seem today to be very narrow exercise?” (203). The interrogative in the Feminist Analysis Key Concept, in other words inquires how woman who live by a man’s rule are kept from enjoying their own bliss, which clarifies how woman have been living off of oppressive rules made my men who have not granted neither joy nor contentment in a woman’s life. Females who do not find contentment or fulfillment in their life because a man is treating them unfairly shows how woman are ceased to be entitled to their own supremacy and self say. Additionally, feminism is demonstrated in The Yellow Wall Paper, where the author reveals how woman do not have the freedom to express themselves in the subtlest and faintest ways keeping woman away from their own delight. The narrator in this story describes how her freedom is being obliterated by her husband’s idea of woman not being able be intellectually equipped to obtain knowledgeable notions. The narrator realizes she cannot express herself through writing under any one’s eyes except her own, and says, “There comes John, and I …show more content…
As the Feminist Theory states, “ texts do exist that help us understand and respond to manifestations of oppression that existed many years or even centuries ago- and that may persist in modified forms today” (204). In other words, there is evidence that shows how woman intimidations exist throughout history up until now. Woman who perceived the thought of their husband being long gone created a complete utterance of existence in their life. Further more, in The Story of an Hour, Kate Chopin is one of the texts that manifest how Ms. Mallard, a woman who is oppressed by her husband, finds a speck of joy as she receives the news of her husband’s “death”. Ms. Mallard reveals her joy when the author says, “She said it over and over under her breath: ‘free, free, free!’” (Chopin 130). Ms. Mallard expresses how free she feels by repeating the words “free” multiple times to herself. The repetition of the words “free” emphasize how Ms. Mallard was kept from living freely, however with the misconception of her husband being alive, she as a woman is no longer allowed to feel free from a man’s regulations. The author incorporates the repetition of the words free to manifest how many women were happy and liberated from any patriarchal practice existing in their life. Woman had no other choice but to feel happy after

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