Charlotte Perkins Gilman And Kate Chopin's The Story Of An Hour

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Diversified authors will use diversified strategies to catch the attention of the reader. Kate Chopin and Charlotte Perkins Gilman are women that were ahead of their time; they both wrote stories that were socially unacceptable but now they are considered the greatest stories. In Kates Chopin’s short story “The story of an hour” the advocate Mrs. Mallard, she suddenly died of a heart attack after she hears of her husband’s death. Charlotte Perkins Gilman wrote the short story of “the yellow wallpaper” with a sacrilegious plot at the time: A women, Jane confined to her bed because of nervous depression, she begins to observe a women underneath the wallpaper of their rented mansion. By the end of the story, …show more content…
Her family has placed her in a rented mansion for a change in scenery to try and help her recover from her illness and she has been confined to her bed for most of her stay. Jane also talks about many tonics and phosphates or phosphates (473) that she is taken to help her recover. Kate Chopin tells the first story in the first sentence by writing about Mrs. Mallard’s distress that is caused by heart problems. Chopin has the reader to believe that such stated inflictions are physical, although the disease is never formally named. Throughout the story the plot thickens and the reader can then determine that Mrs. Mallard’s condition is not physical. Chopin uses the expressions “no powerful will bending her” (Chopin 307) and “she did not hear the story”…. “With a paralyzed inability to accept its significance” (307) this connived Mrs. Mallard’s true distain for her husband. Chopin extends the suspense by the ending of the story on the same path that she began with she names Mrs. Mallard’s death that of a …show more content…
Mrs. Mallard’s disorder was misdiagnosed by her husband, her brother and physician. They believed she was suffering from a heart condition but there was never any evidence that would prove of this during the story. When Mrs. Mallard’s was in her room, her sister, Josephine was worried about Mrs. Mallard making herself sick because she was trying to be alone and she was suffering from the death of her husband. Chopin has given the reader an observation to Mrs. Mallard’s thoughts by using a third person limited omniscient narrator, and by doing this will allow the reader to realize that Mrs. Mallards family concept of her health was fictitious. Close to the end of the story the doctors and Mrs. Mallards family had concluded that she had a heart attack after all she was happy to see her husband was alive, while in reality, she died as a result of not wanting to live with him. Jane’s illness was also discredited by her family. Jane writes that her husband “does not believe I am Sick!” (Perkins Gilman 373) though she does not reveal her concerns on the issue with him. Jane is saddened because john, “a physician of high standing, and one’s own husband, assures friends and relatives that there is really nothing the matter with one” (473). Her brother, is also a

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