Charles Labrie Case Study

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Register to read the introduction… Charles watched as his sister spiraled into a darkness which he could not comprehend. She was constantly probed and prodded while being shackled and restrained. In his early 20's she was taken away and institutionalized. During his travels he observed many asylums for the insane and visited thousands suffering from the same disease and vowed that he would make it his life's mission to help anyone who had been afflicted with mental illness. His plans were to build the best institution in the world. He travelled once again to the United States as the US was growing rapidly and had reached a population of 100 million. Charles visited the first US institution established in Williamsburg, Virginia and made notes of how he could improve treatment and move toward a more humane and moral therapy. He purchased a plot of land and broke ground in 1913 and began building. After 4 years and the threat of a World War In 1917, The Sanctuary had finally opened its doors and began filling with hundreds of afflicted. Word spread fast throughout the country that Charles Labrie, noble and affluent humanitarian had opened the most advanced institution in the country. He employed the most …show more content…
He suffered from a very rare form of tissue degeneration. His body was literally devouring itself bit by bit, cell by cell. Several orderlies were present during Charles' visit and they proceeded to restrain him. He was placed into a solitary padded cell in The Sanctuary and was treated as any other patient. For years Dr. Hammond performed extraordinary experiments on patients, orderlies and himself all with the hopes of finding a cure to his fatal illness. He began transplanting mechanical armatures onto patients, implanting large battery pack powered devices into their brains and began a complete hostile takeover of The Sanctuary. His crusade included mind control, brainwashing, lobotomies, electroshock, brain transplantation and biomechanical experimentation all in the hopes for a cure. As days became weeks and months became years Charles Labrie was held in solitary confinement and given enough sustenance to barely stay alive, but the incessant droning of Dr. Hammond's "education" being fed through the facilities loudspeakers day in and day out was too much for anyone's psyche. With only his 13th Century Bible to keep him company he sat in his cell and continued to recite passages. It has been over

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