Comparison Of Charles Colson's God And Government

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Charles Colson’s God and Government: An insider’s View On The Boundaries Between Faith & Politics breaks down the conflicts between two kingdoms: God’s and our government. Fear of another crusades would happen and the possibility of an overpowering religious government could arise (Colson 47). Colson believes that the christian foundation and morals is what the American government should take after. He says that in some views of the non-believers they agree with values of some religious faiths, “Today, many thinkers, even those who reject orthodox faith, agree that a religious-value consensus is essential for justice and concord” (Colson 52).
He goes on saying how we need, “civil structure” because not only religion can fulfil order and “Both
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Having these rights would cause a conflict between the structure and implementation on some laws that would harm others from practicing their religion. I believe the structure between church and state should be separated due to our country being able to express their choice in religion and overpowering one part of the government or another. I see the most effect way of adding any christian belief into the system would to at the least keep the ten commandments, which in others eyes are natural ways of living everyone should live by.
Colson desires for more christians in politics since the christian majority has died down. He wants christians to bring in God’s righteousness and justice to apply it into our governing system. Also bringing more christian morals would improve the wellbeing of America. I agree with Colson’s view of the law and how whoever is in rule, makes the rules and decisions. With more christians in policy regulation and law making, I feel that more justice and rightful decision would be made. However, the conflict between the past religious decision made people lose their faith in a christian worldview. The problems that Prohibition created from the 1920’s and 30’s made people rebel, which was the opposite of what the mission was trying to do. The ban of alcohol was supposed to help keep safety in the lives of the citizens but, it
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Colson says that, “On the surface this shortcut might seem an appealing answer to America’s declining morality. It is, however, simplistic and dangerous
Grider 3 triumphalism”(Colson 343). The conflict between the power of God and man show in our politics, the ability to successfully introduce and intertwine religion and government would take time to work. However, sadly I believe we are too far for a new system, but I know with this new presidency things will change, whether better or good. After reading Colson’s view I wonder what he would of thought about this upcoming residency, but I believe that he would see it as a good step away from liberalism.
Colson’s views are similar to mines but not quite there regarding the separation of church and state. He views it as a conflict between morals of others and I see it as a divider to keep the rights of other citizens to freely practice without conflict of other religions. I do agree and believe that the state should follow the morals of christians such as the Ten Commandments. Colson has definitely challenged my opinions of God in government, but I still believe it would be messy to deal with at this time for our country. His views and mines both come from similar christian backgrounds and beliefs, but there are still differences. However, after reading his book and taking in his views I respect his boldness and way

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