Charles Baudelaire's Definition Of Romanticism

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Introduction

A Coming of Age

In 1846, almost 10 years after the Romanticism movement diminished, Charles Baudelaire wrote the most commonly used and celebrated definition of Romanticism.

“Romanticism is precisely situated neither in choice of subject nor in exact truth, but in a way of feeling”.

Romanticism was born out of conflict and a search for more, refuting the Neo-Classicism movement, which was revitalised by Napoleon because of his fascination with the Roman empire, believing that it would glorify France and Napoleons rule in a new light [figure 1]. Neo-classism was articulated, rational and precise; highly favoured by the intellectuals of the Enlightenment movement. Both neo-classism and the enlightenment ideals played an important
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From the outset, the movements intent was to look within and celebrate individuality. The romantics came from the ashes of the French revolution; Napoleons fall and from the cities in England during the industrial revolution. Romanticism was started from “opposition and sorrow” (pg.11, b.brown) during a social transformation and national identity crisis. Throughout most of the eighteenth century, the enlightenment was dominating thinking around culture and society in Europe, however, it eventually saw its own demise towards the end of the century, with philosophers eventually denying human experience and having scepticism take over the minds, leading to question our existence and purpose; David Hume, a leading enlightenment philosopher summaries this crisis when he …show more content…
In painting, Romanticism celebrated the aesthetic function of art, including colour and symbolism. An example of some romantic painters are William Blake, Henry Fuseli, J M W Turner and Francisco Goya. These artists explored eroticism, fear, death, love, existentialism and life itself; this allowed painters to move away from the perfection of neoclassicism to the imperfection of their time, or in other words, the romantic art came from a “disillusion with the contemporary world” (pg.13, b.brown). When we think of the world we’re in now, the terms ‘war’ and ‘revolution’ are very familiar in our young century. We’ve experienced civil wars in Western Asia and deadly conflict in Europe. Furthermore, we’re experiencing a gadget revolution from the likes we’ve never seen before, ever more distancing ourselves from both each other and our surroundings. Therefore, one could propose that it’s never been more important that we create using inspiration from

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