Charlemagne's Influence Of Education

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After the fall of the Roman Empire in the late 5th century, the eastern Byzantine Empire flourished while the western regions disintegrated into fragmented kingdoms without any unifying authority. Europe was in the midst of its Dark Ages when Charlemagne was born in 742 AD. This time was marked by frequent warfare; therefore there were few cultural achievements during this time. Charlemagne became ruler of one kingdom in Germany in 768 AD, immediately setting out to expand his territory. Through numerous battles, he had conquered most of inland Europe. Where his rule was established, Charlemagne implemented the same reforms, creating a common identity in his peoples. What made Charlemagne such a distinguished and successful leader were his …show more content…
Around the time of Charlemagne, education was a rather neglected and non-traditional field. Before Charlemagne’s reforms, it was primarily the sons of kings and nobles who received any proper form of education, although it was a rudimentary education that did not include rhetoric, grammar or any of the Liberal arts, but did include and mainly focused on military training. This was to ensure their futures in the military. Charlemagne did not replace this system however; he incorporated it into his reformed educational system. The priests and monks were nearly the only entities to receive a different form of education before Charlemagne, as they needed to know how read prayer books, recite mass and lean doctrine. Charlemagne recognized the poor educational state of the Frankish people and took it upon himself to implement educational reforms. Firstly, Charlemagne summoned prominent scholars throughout Europe. Among those who accepted the king’s invitation were Peter of Pisa, Paul the Deacon, Theodulf of Orleans, Joseph from Ireland and Alcuin. These highly intelligent scholars formed an unofficial “Palace Academy” whose primary objective was to educate the court. Charlemagne also wanted to have a proper education for himself, as well as his family, in order to set a good example for his subjects; he and his family therefore took lessons from Alcuin. This revival of learning led to the Carolingian …show more content…
His success in combat became evident through campaigns the Frankish army was a part of and their triumphant conclusions. His accomplishments include the subduing of Aquitaine; defeat of Lombard king, Desiderius, the incorporation of Lombardy and Bavaria into the Frankish kingdom, and the integration of the Frisians and Slavs. Once a war was initiated, Charlemagne remained resolute in bringing about a permanent and definitive conclusion. This was made apparent during the war fought against the Avars, which lasted eight years. The monarch would only cease fighting after the capture of the Hun’s hoard and completely annihilating the enemy. His victories and resoluteness can be seen in the longest war he fought, that of which was fought ruthlessly for 33 years against the pagan Saxons, while being involved in other campaigns. Throughout these 33 years, the Saxons would succumb to the king’s authority as often as they would rebel against him. Despite their stubborn defiance, he was able to achieve in the conquest of Saxony and Christianizing (“Charlemagne”

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