Characteristics Of Liberal Education

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Self Portrait According to the Meriam-Webster dictionary website, liberal education can be defined as, “education based on the liberal arts and intended to bring about the improvement, discipline, or free development of the mind or spirit” (2016). Throughout IS 101, deeper insight of what that definition truly means and the characteristics of being liberally educated were discussed and talked about. The IS 101 Reader was the main source of this information and was supplemented by a few other books. Inquiry Studies 101 taught me what I believe to be the core characteristics and definition of a liberal learner. As this paper continues, characteristics of a liberal learner, my goals in applying these learning concepts in life, and a basic …show more content…
The first of these components is thinking and learning on a deeper level. Regularly, we discussed in class our thoughts and ideas on subjects. At the beginning of the course, it seemed un-natural and odd, but by the end of the semester it was becoming a common thing to push my brain to think on such a level of complexity. This also transferred over to the papers and reflections we wrote, where I honed in on my own thoughts and faith. This brings me to my next component of the liberal arts. Faith. Liberal arts give students more of a connection with the community and is focused on service. This aspect gives students the chance to become closer in their faith. The third and final component I think of when the purpose of liberal arts comes to mind is seeing things as a whole. Liberal arts are credited with covering a broad array of learning. This allows for a diverse level of knowledge, and gives another option for looking at things. Not only do the liberal arts open up a person’s mind to these components, but it also gives a person …show more content…
Thomas Jefferson once said, “knowledge is power, that knowledge is safety, and that knowledge is happiness.” Learning expands the mind. Plato uses a scenario in which prisoners are locked up in a cave and when one is released, he discovers the light of the world. This is a metaphor for learning and how once you have begun down that path, you do not want to go back to the cave (28). Learning is also important because it is crucial for development. Research and development of silk led to the connection of the world due to the Silk Road. The development that went into this prized material connected the eastern to western worlds and became a booming industry that continues today

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