Plato's Autonomy

1849 Words 8 Pages
1. Justice in the individual as defined by Plato as being a completely internal aspect of a person. According to Plato, every person’s soul can be divided into three main parts. The first part is the rational part which seeks out the truth of the surrounding environment. Next comes the part of the soul that is responsible for the emotions that we feel; this part of the soul is the spirited part. The want to have honor and other feelings of contentment comes from within this spirited section of the soul. Finally, there is a part of the soul that is responsible for wanting everything else such as sex, drinking and desires. This final part of the soul is classified by Plato as the appetite section and is the largest part of the soul. The only …show more content…
119 443d). With appetite being the final and largest part of the soul it is consequently the hardest section to completely control. If one were to allow this section to rule over the others, it could be catastrophic. A person would act out in all the wrong ways and focus prematurely on desires. This is why it becomes so important for the rational part of the soul to be able to suppress and control all of the irrational desires that one has. However, one cannot be completely run by rationality, the balance for the rational part can be found in the spirit of the soul. The spirited part of the soul allows emotion to be brought into the equation therefore bring compassion and the want to be an honorable being into the light. With honor and compassion on one’s mind it becomes a necessity to control irrational desires but with the feelings of oneself and others clearly regulated. To come full circle, one must not always act on the behalf of how others feel but must allow the appetite part of the soul to allow personal desires to be fulfilled in some way. When all three parts of the soul are in perfect balance, one will find justice radiating from the inside of the …show more content…
Much like the soul of a person there is a separation of characteristics of the city when looking at the people as a whole and there is a separation of the people of the city into groups as well. Within the walls of a perfect city, Plato classifies people into one of three classes; the guardians, auxiliaries and workers. The three characteristic of a city that can be critically analyzed to distinguish where justice in a city can be found are wisdom, courage, and moderation. When looking at the proper judgment that is done in the city one is looking at the section of the city that Plato labels as wisdom. Wisdom in a city is attained through the knowledge of maintaining good relationships with other. Wisdom is not knowledge of the little things but rather knowledge of the city as a whole. True wisdom is not held by many but rather the smallest class of people found in the city: the guardians. The guardians are the people in the city that have gone through the most training and education in music/poetry and physical training. By being the best fit and smartest people in the city they are trusted to do what is best for all. Courage in the city can be found through looking at the preservation of the city as a whole. The preservation includes when people stand up to do different tasks and make educated decisions that will benefit the group as a whole. This includes sticking to the beliefs that are hold even in the face of temptation and when they are tested. According to Plato,

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