Characteristics Of Gay Sex Partner Violence

1687 Words 7 Pages
Explain the characteristics of gay and lesbian intimate partner abuse. Then thoroughly discuss explanations for the failure/reluctance of gay/lesbian victims to report domestic violence victimization to police.
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a serious yet often ignored issue facing LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities. Until recently most studies of partner violence have been almost exclusively of heterosexual partners, with only limited information about prevalence/incidence of partner violence among gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people. Same gender partner violence is often invisible and hidden but the dynamics (social stress, power, alcohol, dependency and isolation) and types of violence in same-gender relationships are similar
…show more content…
IPV Issues are much more complicated for lesbian, gay and transgendered people of color due to the ignorance about transgender people, prejudice, and discrimination result in a lack of recognition of relationship violence and lack of appropriate services.
Traditional views of gender roles, heterosexism, and negative attitudes toward homosexuality, prejudice and discrimination based on sexual orientation contribute to unique issues and major hurdles when trying to find funding and conduct research of same-gendered intimate partner violence, as well as when providing services to people who don 't fit in the stereotype of a domestic violence survivor. Transgendered individuals can be classified in heterosexual partner violence and same-gendered partner violence.
Below are definitions of some common terms that apply to all types of relationships.
Relationship partners – includes spouses (current and former), nonmarital partners (current and former), dates and girlfriends or boyfriends (heterosexual and
…show more content…
Gay male and lesbian victims appear to be less likely than victims in opposite-sex couples to call the police for help. This may be due, in part, to concern that the responding officers would consider the incident to be "mutual combat" and not take the time to determine the primary aggressor, which could result in both the victim and the assailant being arrested.
Victims who are not “out” publicly may be reluctant or unwilling to seek help from the police, the courts, and other services because it would require them to reveal their sexuality and possibly face embarrassment, ridicule, or even harassment. Same-sex relationships are often demonized or marginalized, “There 's the feeling that we don 't want to attach something additionally bad to us, so it 's not talked about.” (SHWAYDER, 2013)
Although all 50 U.S. states issue protection from abuse orders (aka restraining orders, stay-away orders, etc.), some do not make this legal remedy available to gay men and lesbians. Many states have sodomy laws that make it illegal to engage in same sex activities so abused partners in same gender relationships may fear going to police or courts. (Group,

Related Documents