The Newgate Calendar Analysis

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Literature holds a powerful role throughout society, as it is a medium of relaying ideas and emotion as well as serving as a source of entertainment. Although not all social classes had access to literature due to poverty and limited opportunities for education, during the, the industrial revolution provided more jobs for the working class and experience that would allow them to enhance their reading skills (Class Discussion). The Newgate Calendar was later introduced around 1830, a series of short, easy to read stories. These stories were specifically written to satisfy the working class as they were written about thrilling and captivating crime stories, which was also intended to hinder the acts of crime by demonstrating their consequences. …show more content…
Victor takes advantage of his knowledge by creating a new species, a role only accepted religiously and by society to be that of God. He wants to have, “A new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me,” (32). His desire to be obeyed by others and his aspiration to be a God is Blasphemy (Class Discussion), serving as the ultimate taboo. His pursuit in forbidden knowledge is sacrilegious and violates what is religiously accepted. In addition, Victor creates his creature using the stolen bones of the dead. The use of the dead to create life is a form of resurrection and thus profane. He plays with the sacredness of human life and death. The ability to control the dead and altering God’s creation appropriates God’s principle role and status that society hold important and values greatly. In addition his want for unnecessary and excessive power is a form of greed, one religion’s greatest. Victor tells the reader as a lesson after he experiences the consequences of his actions, “Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is …show more content…
The use of isolation and gloomy settings observed through Walton’s expedition, Victor’s laboratory and the cemetery he goes to as well as many others, provoke thrill and mystery that sets the tone of the novel. Furthermore, moral and religious taboos such as Victor’s pursuit in becoming God and greed for power creates disastrous outcomes. Finally, the vengeful motives taken on by the creature and inflicted on Victor introduces tragedy and violent deaths that contribute to making the novel similar to what is seen through gothic-inspired Penny

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