Character Analysis Of Tom Sawyer And Huckleberry Finn

1949 Words 8 Pages
The novel is a humorous fantasy, written in the tradition of a boy’s adventure story. In this novel, there are two major characters, Tom sawyer and huckleberry Finn. The novel remaining his childhood, from this childish viewpoint, the pupil world appears rather foolish. For examples social institutions, education opposed their behavior, because the people want to live like them. Tom’s fortunes swing between the two and his sprit follows suit. There are two distinct types of language, the narrative voice and the colloquial language. Twain describes the characters about their proceedings. In a manner of dominant terms, twain also uses the border and more obvious form of humor, when dealing with the villagers and society. Twain uses the book to …show more content…
he is the embodiment of boyhood outbreaks. He is always disappointing the pupils who surround him. Break the rules, fighting with other boys, failing to perform his chores, lying, theft sweet treats from his Aunt Polly's private place. Yet Twain's stories of Tom's misdeeds are humorous and affectionate, rather than judgmental moral lessons. Tom's dirty trick in fact, often bring delight and even incalculable insight into a situation, with the boys' communication as a gang often satirically mirroring the behaviors of pupils in society. Tom's outbreaks earn him the admiration of the other boys in town, who misbehave to lesser degrees. Huckleberry Finn is the only boy who is wilder than Tom. Huck lives with his father, who is a drunkard; he lives an unsupervised life that is every other boy's dream: he never goes to school or church, he smokes, he wears whatever he wants, and he sleeps outdoors each night. Outbreaks are a way for boys to bond, to the exclusion of a few well behaved boys, such as Sid, and girls, who are more reserved than …show more content…
Huck has also matured considerably over the novel, and he performs the most heroic act of all of saving the widow Douglas's life. Yet Huck continues to avoid the propriety of society having manners and attending church, for example, even after he has gained the approval of St. Petersburg's citizens. He prefers to live as an independent character on the edge of society, avoiding the hypocrisies that twain has satirized throughout the novel. End of the novel, Huck and Tom represent different aspects of adulthood, but they continue to bond through their boyish fantasies, and this capacity for friendship is a characteristic of boyhood that twain would have his adult readers see as true knowledge. The pupil of quaint St. Petersburg sees themselves as a law-abiding, church-going, family-based group that must police its children. The most respected figures in the novel are Judge Thatcher, who is in charge of administering the law. Nearly every villager shows up to church on Sunday, so that community is formed through an agreed upon set of ethical values. The education of the village's children consists largely of learning to follow inflexible rules that are intended to protect these values. The adventures of Tom and his friends often reveal gaps in the pupil' logic and inconsistencies in their

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