Frankenstein Monster Analysis

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It is no doubt that the monster in Mary Shelley’s book, Frankenstein, is a complex character. From murdering a total of six people, three directly and three indirectly, to having hopes to be accepted by society makes the monster a two-sided character. The monster shows his good side several times in the book and then taints his image by killing an innocent person. Despite the crimes he commits, the monster connects with the readers on an emotional level. Readers are instantly attached to the monster as they pity him from the moment his creator leaves him. They embark on a journey with the monster as he finds himself. It comes to the reader’s surprise when the monster kills his first victim, for they just watched him develop into such a sincere …show more content…
The monster’s first encounter with another sign of life includes Victor, his creator, who runs away in horror, leaving the monster in utter confusion. This experience attributes to the hate he develops later for the entire human race. The way society treated him also attributes to that hate. The monster understands that something about him leaves people to fear him and run from him. This is exactly why the monster hid from the DeLacey’s. He feared they would reject him like the rest of the humans he had encountered up to that point, which they did. This constant abandonment from the people that were supposed to love him left the monster hopeless and lonely. What really sets the monster off if when he makes a final request for a female partner and is rejected by his creator. At this point, he assumes that Victor is intentionally making his life a living hell and decides to take revenge back on him. However, it is to be kept in mind that the murders that he commits come from the anger and resentment he held inside towards his creator and society. Readers sympathize with the monster even after he kills innocent people like William, Henry and Elizabeth because they understand the pain he is under. In reality, an abandoned child left on a street and left to defend herself against the judgmental society …show more content…
Though the monster’s acts of murder alone would make him seem evil, his killings are justified by the distress he was put under. Completely alone and rejected, he believed the only justice that would serve him right would be if his creator felt the same pain he did. The readers connect with the pain that the monster is feeling and understand his reasoning behind the crimes he committed. The monster makes readers react sympathetically towards him due to his innocence at first, his isolation from his creator and society due to his horrid looks, and his strikingly relatable emotions. The monster in Frankenstein represents the detrimental affects that the isolation of oneself can have. Being bullied for his looks, not having a strong support system of loved ones that care, and being rejected by everyone left him to become an anger-filled, revenge-seeking monster. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, the two gunman that started the Columbine Massacre fit the above description almost too accurately. Has society not learned that the key to peace is

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