Character Analysis Of Shakespeare's Othello

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In Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello, the title character is a 16th century Moorish general of the Venetian army who, because of the cultural and historical background of the play’s setting, the playwright, and the original intended audience, is portrayed as both well-respected for his stereotypical military prowess and disparaged for his race. Similarly, because of Othello ability to fulfill the desires of the Venetian people they loved and adored him. It was not until they gained perspective into who Othello was, a Moorish man, that they hated the color of his skin but loved the content of his character. African American men in today’s American society are both praised for (physical superiority) and hated for the thuggish image that many people …show more content…
Indeed, Othello is further cast as the standard Moor when he kills Desdemona. By this time, his passionate love for her has turned into passionate vengeance. However, it is still the same passion and aggression that stereotypical Moors would have. Like the stereotype, Othello violently smothers Desdemona until she dies”(OTHELLO) Was this fair paper, this most goodly book, Made to write “whore” upon? What committed? Committed? O thou public commoner! I should make very forges of my cheeks That would to cinders burn up modesty Did I but speak thy deeds. What committed? Heaven stops the nose at it and the moon winks, The bawdy wind that kisses all it meets Is hushed within the hollow mine of earth And will not hear’t. What committed!” Impudent strumpet! (DESDEMONA) By heaven, you do me wrong!(IIII. ii. 78-84). He also tries to have Cassio killed, swearing that he would “(DESDEMONA) What, is he angry? (LODOVICO) Maybe the letter moved him, For, as I think, they do command him home, Deputing Cassio in his government.” (IIII. i. …show more content…
Othello’s speech constructs him as different in another way, as an exotic and romantic figure. Admittedly this is a positive stereotype, not one based on physical appearance. The line which introduced Othello into the company of noblemen and senators reads, “Here comes Brabantio and the valiant Moor (DUKE) Valiant Othello, we must straight employ you Against the general enemy Ottoman— I did not see you. Welcome, gentle signior. We lacked your counsel and your help tonight” (I.iii.47-52). The senators present go on to depict Othello as “brave,” “capable,” and again “valiant;” between this praise and the speech by Othello and Desdemona removing any legitimate complaint against the man, one leaves the third scene with a very positive image of the

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