Character Analysis Of Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar'

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Julius Caesar Rough Draft: “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in the stars, but in ourselves.” This is a quote from Shakespeare’s work The Tragedy of Julius Caesar that explains to readers how a flaw is within one 's inner self including the choices they make. The play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar opens with Brutus in the midst of a decision that may shape the future of Rome. He must choose whether or not he wishes to join the conspiracy of Romans who wish to kill Caesar. After agreeing and revising the original plan, they go through with the task but not everyone is pleased with what the conspirators have done. Caesar’s good friend, Antony, appears to be a grieving friend so Brutus, because of his trusting ways, allows Antony to speak at Caesar’s …show more content…
For example, “Into what dangers would you lead me Cassius,/ That you would have me seek into myself/ For that which is not in me? (I. ii. 63-65). This quote includes Brutus asking Cassius what troubles he will lead Brutus into that Brutus would need something he does not already behold. It is saying that Brutus believes Cassius needs something that Brutus has, most likely his title. By asking this question of Cassius, Brutus is showing his weariness about Cassius’s plans. Though he does trust Cassius there is a part of him that suspects what is truly happening hidden behind his act. As a result of Brutus not trusting his original instinct, he is basically setting his own end simply not present at the time. Another way Brutus’s trust is showed is through the phrase “That you do love me I am nothing jealous;/ What you would work me to I have some aim.” (I. ii. 162-163) This quote explains that though Brutus does know that Cassius likes and trusts him, Brutus has an idea of what Cassius is planning on doing about Caesar. In addition, this reveals that even though Brutus knew from the beginning what Cassius’s plans were, he went along with them anyway. By putting his faith in Cassius and his plot, Brutus was setting how the remainder of his time would be. Though he thought it was the best option for Rome, after all is said and done Rome falls to the hands of …show more content…
For instance, “But, alas Caesar must bleed for it. And gentle friends,/ Let 's kill him boldly, but not wrathfully.” (II. i. 170-172). When Brutus says this he is saying that Caesar must be killed in order to save Rome from destruction, but that it must be done carefully so that they do not upset the Romans too much. This passage reveals how easily Brutus fell into the trap of the other conspirators. He took the plan on as his own and then worked to set guidelines for the others to follow as if it were his idea from the start. He becomes so caught up in this that he is unable to see the varying reasons the other conspirators held for killing Caesar. When Brutus agreed to the plan and assisted in the killing of Caesar, his appearance of a noble man of Rome changed and he is now viewed as a full fledge conspirator. This is also seen later when Shakespeare writes “Good Gentlemen, look fresh and merrily./ Let not our looks put on our purposes,/ But bear it as our Roman actors do,/ With untired spirits and formal constancy./ And so good morrow to you every one.” (II. i. 224-228) When this is said it is explaining that the conspirators must act as if nothing out of the ordinary is going on so no one believes anything to be wrong. This reveals simply how easily Brutus goes along with the plan. He grouped himself in with the conspirators and sees them all as good friends. Because of

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