Character Analysis Of Pedro's Chaparro

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With a tired sight —slightly shaded by the effects of the sun—Pedro proclaims, “I’m a rancher,” and when a Mexican man expresses this, you better know what he really means. Absolutely, a Mexican rancher appreciates homemade corn or flour tortillas with a daily and freshly cooked Mexican meal. Fortunately, Pedro’s wife knows how to make and cook those. Positively, Pedro’s friends can call him Mexican “macho,” which makes him proud. He does not see anything wrong with it because it’s the way he has grown. Respectfully, Pedro avoids talking with his coworkers’ wives, because in Pedro’s perspective a woman who approaches him without her husband, only wants to flirt. Religiously, a Mexican rancher always respects his job because it is the …show more content…
His serious face disappears when Pedro’s peculiar humor sense makes act of presence. Also, some friends think he has saved money, which Pedro informs, “It is not true, and I don’t know from where they got that idea” In addition, some people think Pedro is “Chaparro” (short), which it is something that could insult a Mexican rancher, but Pedro bursts out laughing, “It is true.” On the other hand, Pedro enjoys talking about politics. Thus, he admires how President Barak Obama achieved the U.S. presidency despite all obstacles, including his skin color. As you can see, a man extolling another man is a common characteristic of a Mexican rancher …show more content…
Certainly, Pedro’s family ranch was small too. He says, “We just had two horses, one donkey, two cows, and several chickens.” When Pedro’s parents realized they needed to move to an urbane city to get their older children into the middle school, he acknowledges, “My parents left me alone,” and with melancholy surrounding the room Pedro continues, “They left me with my grandma and a cousin when I was 8 years old.” Before parting, Pedro’s father told him in a serious way, ‘Now, you are “the man” of the house.’ Thereon, Pedro understood at early age, it was his turn to take care of the animals. But it is not the end, when Pedro’s parents and siblings left, he admits, “I was very courageous at first, but when they left I shed tears for several nights.” Fortunately, after six long months, Pedro expresses in relief, “They came back and took me with them, but years later we had to return to our ranch.” Years later, when Pedro finished elementary school, he got a job in a bakery where he learned the skills of this so popular Mexican trade which would help him to start his yearned future in

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