Character Analysis Of Lucky Child By Loung Ung

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Loung Ung, the author of Lucky Child, was a survivor of the Cambodian Genocide that happened during the period between 1975 and 1979, when more than two million Cambodians were killed by the Khmer Rouge, which counted as nearly 25% of the country’s total population (p. xi). Every aspect of life was monitored and controlled by the Khmer Rouge, who was aiming to clear all their political threats and to create a utopian state (p. xii). Most of the citizens, including Loung and her family members, were forced to leave the city and to work in labor camps. They had to endure starvation, diseases, separation from family, and the fear of being killed. Loung was placed in a child-soldier’s training camp, where children were taught to grow hate inside …show more content…
It turned out that moving to America didn’t end her pain or ease her homesick. Such extraordinary suffer lasted for nearly 15 years until Loung reunited with her family members in 1995. Loung’s severe mental trauma mainly came from two aspects: the death and forced separation of her family members as well as the difficulties toward fitting into the American society. In Lucky Child, Loung describes how she was struggling with PTSD after leaving her family and came to the United States. The most significant symptoms Loung had experienced were the re-experiencing symptoms, the avoidance symptoms, and the hyper-arousal …show more content…
However, fitting into the American society was very stressful and challenging, which worsen off Loung’s mental conditions. During the first few years in the United States, Loung has to live on the food stamps, which is the financial assistance that was offered by the American government to help the poor. She was forced to accept the “embarrassment, lose of face and shame” (p.47) that came along with the assistance. Also, the lack of “acceptance (p.30)” due to the fact that Cambodian-Americans are the minority group in the United States Loung had once developed into a low self-esteem because she felt that she was indifferent and isolated from the majority. According to Loung, it was hard for her to make American friends and she felt hurtful when her classmate showed their racial prejudice (p.65). Also, Loung was under the pressure to achieve outstanding academic performance, which could “bring honor, pride, and dignity to the whole family,” (p.83). The heavy pressure was “ hanging around her neck like a huge clunky cowbell (p.83). All those difficulties had become obstacles on Loung’s way to recover from

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