Character Analysis Of Hester Prynne's Scarlet Letter

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"She was ladylike, too, after the manner of the feminine gentility of those days; characterized by a certain state and dignity, rather than by the delicate, evanescent, and indescribable grace which is now recognized as its indication. …show more content…
She rebels against her family, against the roles, that are assigned to her by the society, against the behavior that is expected from her, against the norms and rules that had created a gilded cage for her to live in. Edna desperately sought for the truth about her and found passion. There is a powerful moment proving the process of Edna’s awakening is in progress, when she returns from her catalytic first swim, and for the first time rests her husband: “She perceived that her will had blazed up, stubborn and resistant. She could not at that moment have done other than denied and resisted. She wondered if her husband had ever spoken to her like that before, and if she had submitted to his command. Of course she had; she remembered that she had. But she could not realize why or how she should have yielded, feeling as she then did.” This is an important step in Edna’s journey to self-discovery, from pretending being a loving mother, diligent housekeeper, devoted wife to experiencing sexual awakening, passionate interest towards art and self-discovering. And that is truth about …show more content…
But Hester and Edna are not being artists only for entertaining their families or friends (as for example Adèle is), but for self realization and estimation. Through their art, our heroines keep on going their road of self discovery and “breaking of boundaries”. “It was so artistically done, and with so much fertility and gorgeous luxuriance of fancy, that it had all the effect of a last and fitting decoration to the apparel which she wore, and which was of a splendour in accordance with the taste of the age, but greatly beyond what was allowed by the sumptuary regulations of the colony” – the result of Hester’s work with letter A. And talking about Enda there was very important moment with Mademoiselle Reisz playing the piano: “The very first chords which Mademoiselle Reisz struck upon the piano sent a keen tremor down Mrs. Pontellier's spinal column. … Perhaps it was the first time she was ready, perhaps the first time her being was tempered to take an impress of the abiding truth. … She saw no pictures of solitude, of hope, of longing, or of despair. But the very passions themselves were aroused within her soul, swaying it, lashing it, as the waves daily beat upon her splendid body. She trembled, she was choking, and the tears blinded

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