Character Analysis In Frankenstein

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On 11 March 1818, the legendary literature masterpiece, Frankenstein, was released to the public by none other than Mary Shelley. Her story has ultimately changed the way humanity views life and is a true testament to the capability of the human mind and will never be forgotten. The monster in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is rarely addressed as a harmless creature and one would find it hard to believe that Creature could be anything other than the antagonist. Although, when Creature tells his life story to his creator, Victor Frankenstein, in the ice caves of Mount Blanc the reader sees the wretched monster in a new light. Creature is awoken into the world by a Victor and unlike the story of man, his creator disowns him, and Creature is forced …show more content…
Prior to the conversation between Victor and Creature in the ice cave in Mount Blanc, the reader feels sympathy for Victor; he wasted his time on a creature that he could not accept. Here, the reader hopes Victor can recover from his experiences. This all changes when Creature tells Victor his story in the cave. For the first time in the book the reader feels sympathy for Creature rather than Victor and even begins to resent Victor for condemning Creature to such a bitter life. When Creature discovers how he came to be, and begins to contemplate his existence he exclaims “Hateful day when I received life! ' I exclaimed in agony. Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance” (119). The monster found Frankenstein 's diary and learned just how much his creator abhorred him. Unfortunately, now Creature matured he understood that Victor made him with high expectations and once Creature read his creator’s journal he realized the raw hate his existence has sparked in his master; moreover, this agonizing truth is made worse by the comparison to man’s origin. There is a strong desire in all humans to make those who gave them life proud of doing so, but …show more content…
Victor acted selfishly and condemned Creature to a life of enmity by shunning his creation at the pivotal point that Creature needed the most attention. Not only did Victor create a life of misery by turning away from his creation but there is the feeling of regret for what could have been. For example, in Chapter 24 after Victor has died Creature proclaims to Walton “My heart was fashioned to be susceptible of love and sympathy; and when wrenched by misery to vice and hatred it did not endure the violence of the change without torture such as you cannot even imagine.” (209-210) Creature believes that he was made for good and his heart could not withstand the amount of hatred he received upon his creation. If the reader looks at Creature as a forgotten child whose creator despised him instead of a monster who wreaked havoc on Victor’s life, one would almost support Creature in his revenge on his

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