Chapter 4 Summary Of Frederick Douglass

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In the early 1800s, Fredrick Douglass began the prolonged and difficult journey of learning how to read and write. Born into slavery, Douglass experienced all the struggles that slaves were tortured with. Douglass had a whole different type of struggle when he became literate. Not only was he a slave to the white man who took control of his physical body, but reading became harmful to his mental state. He discovered what slavery was and how it was involved in America; this dragged him down but simultaneously brought upon a new light. In chapter VII of Fredrick Douglass’ autobiography, he attempts to convince slave owners that slaves can be of equal intelligence and value as white men. His writing brings true feeling to the reader and places …show more content…
He described his feeling after reading as “It opened my eyes to the horrible pit, but to no ladder upon which to get out.” Personally, this section hit hard at my heart. While I cannot relate directly, I understand how he feels. Douglass feels as though the whole world has been lying to him, and these words have produced the truth. Although it’s hard to hear, a pretty lie is worse than an ugly …show more content…
In his fifth paragraph of chapter VII, he recounted the story of when he encountered a book called “The Columbian Orator” at age 12. In summary, it was a slave and his master having an argument in which the slave won every argument the master brought up. Douglass said “The slave was made to say some very smart as well as impressive things in reply to his master… the conversation resulted in the voluntary emancipation of the slave on the part of the master.” This brought up feelings of hope for him, because in this situation, the intelligence of the slave won his freedom. While this is a nice story, I felt sorry for Douglass. In my personal opinion, this story was probably a false sense of hope to slaves. However, slaves weren’t meant to read at all. Therefore, I imagine this was actually a warning to slave holders, to keep the knowledge of their slaves low so they wouldn’t

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