The Validity Of The Act Of Parliament In The UK

Great Essays
Chapter 4: Legislation
Answer Structure
1. Intro
-Act of Parliament is also known as domestic legislation is the law made by Parliament.
-Parliament consists of the House of Commons and House of Lords, and every bill has to pass to the Queen for consent.
-Members of Parliament sit in the House of Commons are elected by the general public in five years, whereas members of the House of Lords are appointed by Queen.
-Parliament is sovereign in the United Kingdom as it can make or unmake any law and no one can question its validity, which held in Pickin v Britain Railway Board (1974).
-Before a bill can become a legislation, it must be drafted on a green paper to collect comments from interested parties and later on a white paper with details of
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This bill are sent to the public bills office and examined by two examiners.
-Crossrail Bill – an east-west rail link across Central London.
Then subject to the Parliamentary Procedure such as standing committee, 2nd Reading, Select Committee, Committee Stage, Report Stage, 3rd Reading, House of Lords and Royal Assent.

3. Advantages
-It is a complete procedure which allows the bill to be debated, scrutinised and amended. -It is democratic as the members in House of Commons are elected by general public and they involve in major part of the law making process.
-The Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949 limited the power of House of Lords as it means the elected government can pass the bill to Queen without the consent of House of Lords.
-The House of Lords is good, treated it as a checking system to refine laws that are being debated and passed through the House of Commons.
-Flexibility of the law making system as due the different types of bills, it is not just the Government that can proposed the bill.

4. Disadvantages
-Undemocratic as the House of Lords are not elected by public and they can change what they don’t like within reason.
-The Law making process is lengthy as it takes few months to pass a
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-A lot of the language, statues and evidence for the Parliaments to make on their laws, which is complexity and nobody can actually

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