Systems Of Government Chapter Summaries

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Chapter one is titled, The Logic of American Politics, and in this chapter a lot is discussed and explained. For example, the midterm election results were mentioned, which was in 2010, and for the Democrats there was no easy way to put that election to them. All President Barack Obama was able to tell the press was to “acknowledge the “shellacking” his party took.” Next was the tax breaks, ending the tax break was simple, Congress had to do nothing. Eventually the law would expire, and the Republican House with the task of having to try and persuade a Senate which is controlled by Democrats and the president to sign for a new legislation that would reinstate the tax breaks. Last but not least, the Constitution Framers, who were assembled …show more content…
The Unitary system of government is centralized with state and local governments administering authority delegated from central government. Examples of the Unitary system of government is the United Kingdom, France, and Japan. The Federation system of government is divided between central and state or local governments. Examples of the Federation system of government is Canada, the United States under the constitution. Last is the Confederation system of government which is held by independent states and delegated to central government by consensus agreements. Examples of the confederation system of government is the United States under the Articles of Confederation. State rights are the rights that belong to various states, especially with reference to the strict interpretation of the Constitution, by which all rights not delegated by the Constitution to the federal government belong to the …show more content…
The Missouri Compromise was enacted by Congress in 1820, the compromise itself was a “political” solution. Civil rights are rights to personal liberty established by the 13th and 14th Amendments by the U.S. Constitution and certain Congressional acts, especially applied to an individual or a minority group. In colonial times, civil rights equaled “civic” rights which is protection against arbitrary actions by the British Crown. Although the words civil rights was not commonly used until the late 1760’s when Americans rallied with “No taxation without Representation.”Civil liberties is the freedom of citizens to exercise customary rights, as of speech or assembly, without unwarranted interference by the

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