Changing Role Of Women In The 1920s Essay

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The Changing Role of Women in the 1920s In modern day society, a woman raising a family and having a career is considered to be the norm. Historically, women were expected to exert modesty in the way they chose to dress and behave, as well as staying at home and performing the duties as a wife, mother, and homemaker. Women’s current modern day role and participation within society and the family household is due to the emergence of change that began in the 1920’s. The drastic reform of the women’s role can be credited to the new type of woman; the Flapper. Flappers reconstructed the image of a woman in a scandalous fashion which ultimately led to the change of women’s perspectives on how they should fit into society. The change of perspectives …show more content…
In the movies, the portrayal of women was full of independence, adorned by fresh fashions and a different lifestyle. Quattrone states that women idolized their favorite movie stars and attempted to copy the movie stars appearance and behaviour. Freedoms such as entering the workforce, engaging in scandalous dances such as the Charleston, smoking cigarettes, and drinking alcohol were depicted in the movies. Women viewers who were influenced by what they saw in the media acquired the self-assurance they needed to pursue careers of their own, which led them to become financially independent (Quattrone). Millions of Flappers watched some of their favorite actresses that were shown in these movies as a guide as to how they should act and behave. Jones explains that women embraced the controversial way of life by purchasing the exact brands of cigarettes, makeup, and clothing that were seen promoted by actresses, such as Louise Brooks. Women also began to speak the same terminology found in Scott Fitzgerald’s novels (Jones) and view the current popular female appearance through newspapers and magazines. With newly introduced technology becoming widespread, such as the radio and gramophone, women were subjected to hearing jazz music (Myrvang) which was associated with the flapper lifestyle of going out in the city and attending speakeasies and Jazz bars (Women: Changing Gender Norms). Advertisements marketed toward women presented them as independent and confident. Different brands for cigarettes targeted their audience for women only (Myrvang). Advertisers created parades in New York on 5th Avenue in order to make smoking more common; these parades were inspired by the suffrage marches in 1910s where women held “torches of freedom”, which in the parades were emanated by

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