Change In Krogstad's Morals

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The biggest change in Krogstad 's values came when he reconnected with his former girlfriend Kristine Linde. Kristine was sent by Nora to try and make Krogstad recant his blackmail letter but she arrived with her own agenda in mind. The meeting opened old wounds for Krogstad and he found himself livid with the reminder of his past heartbreak. When Kristine tried to defend her past actions, Krogstad was first rigid in his views and refused to forgive her: "Was there any more to understand - except what 's all too common in life? A calculating woman throws over a man the moment a better catch comes by." (Ibsen, 1140) However, he quickly had a change of heart once Kristine reflected on the prospect of them getting back together. This event signaled …show more content…
His treatment of Nora was morally wrong and was the start of a great change in her life. During their first meeting, Nora was terrified of Krogstad and the turmoil that he could potentially bring into her life. With the blackmail attempt, Krogstad had Nora cornered between two equally difficult situations. Either she could convince her husband Torvald to let Krogstad keep his job, which was a nearly impossible feat, or she could let Torvald learn the truth. With the position she was put in, she was almost forced to tell her husband the truth about her actions, a situation she greatly feared: "This secret - my joy and my pride - that he should learn it in such a crude and disgusting way - learn it from you. You 'd expose me to the most horrible unpleasantness." (Ibsen, …show more content…
Her husband found out about her past misdeeds and was unsympathetic in his response. Nora was heartbroken and started to realize that her relationship with her husband was not what she thought it was. Indirectly, even though his actions were cruel, the situation Krogstad placed Nora in actually helped her in the long run. She opened her eyes to the true nature of her husband and learned to stand up for herself. By the end of the story, the ordeal Krogstad put her through brought great change to her characteristics and life. Without the experience, Nora would have remained the naive, submissive housewife that she was at the beginning of the story and would not have learned how to take control of her own

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