Autism Spectrum Disorder Case Study

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Introduction

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a very common developmental disability in the United States, and affects children on a varying spectrum of mild to severe. It is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders, found in approximately 1 of every 110 children (McPartland, 2012). ASD individuals often demonstrate non-normal behavioral, learning, social, and auditory interactions to varying levels of functional ability.

Disease Diagnosis and Acquisition

Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a lifelong developmental disability that includes many different behavioral symptoms. According to DSM-5, the most recent set of criteria that psychologists and psychiatrists use to diagnose and classify mental illnesses, those with Autism
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It is important to have programs at every level because each kind of program plays a different role. District services are useful to help diagnose disabilities because they directly interact with the student. State and federal programs help in securing funding and passing laws that make the learning environment more accommodating to the student.
At the district level, every ASD child must go through the Individualized Education Program (IEP). This process shows how each child is first considered for evaluation, is then evaluated, and then decided by a committee if the child requires special assistance in school (Rich, 2010). Some more specific programs and initiatives at every level are listed below:

• Issaquah School District: For children ages 3 to 5 years old, there are free screenings to identify preschoolers with possible delays in language and speech, cognitive development, fine and gross motor skills, and behavior. To find out more information, email Jennifer Wiechert at
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Since autism spectrum disorder causes a wide range of learning disabilities that are unique to each child, classrooms must remain equipped to help every student work around those difficulties. When making accommodations and modification to a classroom for a child with autism, we should remember that every child is different and as teachers should make these changes according to that child’s disabilities. But some of changes can look like visual or written schedules, having extra support for the student such as special Edu., allow extra time to complete academic work, provide pictures such as flash cards for communication support, model tasks, role-playing situations, social stories and have an individualized educational plan

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