Challenges In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

775 Words 4 Pages
The 1920’s was a momentous decade in American history. World War I had just ended, so the economy was experiencing a surge unlike ever before. Soon afterwards, prohibition was ratified, which resulted in a gigantic influx of alcohol being illegally produced and sold. Additionally, this was a revolutionary period for women as well. They gained their suffrage, shortened their hair and dresses, had sex for pleasure, and drank as much as they pleased. In other words, the women of the Roaring Twenties completely defied society’s expectations of them, and they obtained more independence than ever before. Of course, this rebellion caused negative feelings in the nation, which may be no better illustrated than in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. …show more content…
Jordan is introduced early in the novel when the narrator, Nick Carraway, meets her at a tiny dinner party at the lavish Buchanan manor. The reader’s initial impression of Baker is that she appears to be particularly knowledgeable, as she is the first to gossip about Tom Buchanan’s infidelity. Subsequently, the reader learns that she is a professional golfer, and Nick states that after her first major tournament, there was “a suggestion that she had moved her ball from a bad lie in the semi-final round.” To clarify, Jordan was the subject of a scandal because there were rumors she cheated in her golf game, and this causes the reader to be suspicious of Jordan being a fraudulent character. Furthermore, she displays an egocentric attitude when defending her mediocre driving abilities by claiming that it is her fellow driver’s duty to be cautious of her. In brief, Fitzgerald depicts Jordan as an unscrupulous lady who will not hesitate to lie or cheat if she can gain the upper …show more content…
Daisy, her husband, Tom Buchanan, and their young daughter, Pam, live together in the extravagant East Egg district of Long Island. When Daisy is first introduced, she is tired of husband’s continuous adultery and neglect; however, she almost completely ignores her daughter. Then as the plot unfolds, she begins to cheat on Tom by having an affair with an old lover, Jay Gatsby. As a result, Daisy commits a series of careless actions without any consideration of the consequences. Most notably, she strikes Myrtle Wilson while driving Gatsby’s yellow car, and she then proceeds to drive away from the scene. As a result of this tragedy, George Wilson believes Gatsby killed Myrtle, so he hunts him down and murders Gatsby before committing suicide. Afterwards, Daisy never confesses to being the one that hit Myrtle with the car. Later Nick comments, “[Daisy and her friends] smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” To summarize, Daisy was a coward who used her money and status as a shield to protect her from the consequences of her thoughtless

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