The Theme Of Knighthood In The Canterbury Tales By Geoffrey Chaucer

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American actress Marilyn Monroe once said, “Respect is one of life’s greatest treasures” (par 11). In medieval times, knights were highly respected in society. These mounted warriors not only received, but rightfully deserved respect from all in society. Medieval communities were captivated by knighthood and its fearless, yet gentle soldiers. Undoubtedly, knighthood was often a common theme in literature and characterized the medieval period. In the renowned British literature classic, The Canterbury Tales, written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the late 1300s, Chaucer follows a diverse group of pilgrims heading from London to Canterbury on a pilgrimage. Chaucer’s Knight is the first pilgrim listed and described as a highly admired figure in society. …show more content…
Ideal knights honored this code of chivalry and reflected the code within every action they performed. Their code required them to be modest, protective, and noble (428). During this period, the knight’s integrity and excellence served as a model for others to follow (“The Knight’s Tale” 23). Moreover, knights defended and were willing to die for the church. Professor Joel Rosenthal described a knight and his deeds quoting, “A knight championed right against injustice and evil, and never surrendered or flinched in the face of the enemy” (par 9). Furthermore, quintessential knights remained true to God and embarked on pilgrimages to pray for spiritual guidance (Gravett 52). Overall, the ideal knight in Chaucer’s time was considered to have courage, honesty, and modesty. The Knight in The Canterbury Tales possesses all of these noble traits and was a true man of …show more content…
In Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, the Knight is an ideal, honest knight. Described as a highly respected figure in society, Chaucer gives no satirical comments and offers nothing but praise for this man of arms (Rossignol 138). By offering no ironic interpretation, unlike most of Chaucer’s pilgrims, the Knight is often referred to as an ideal knight. The tale the Knight narrates is the first told in The Canterbury Tales due to the Knight’s status. In The Knight’s Tale, the Knight reflects his steadfast personality by describing two knights following the code of behavior. Their courtesy extended from respectable battle tactics to gentle service to ladies. Overall, Chaucer’s glorified description of the Knight tells readers how appreciative he is for the Knight’s pureness. In remembering Marilyn Monroe’s quote, the highest respect Chaucer offers to the Knight is treasured. In medieval times, infamous for the corruptness of society, the Knight’s immaculate nature is remarkable as is his allegiance to God and his people which Chaucer depicts so clearly and eloquently in The Canterbury

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