Cello Suite Part 1: The Critique Of Johann Sebastian Bach

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Johann Sebastian Bach was one of the great composers of his time. His Cello Suite #1 was one of his well-known works and very much recognizable still today. I have heard this specific piece several times throughout my life but have never really taken the time to interpret its meaning. I immediately enjoyed listening to it and felt intrigued to further my study of this piece after my initial review of it. After reviewing the piece several times, I realized not only is it the simplicity of one instrument being played, the difficulty of scale in which it is played that drew me in but the bass notes that are masterfully placed throughout the suite. The higher pitch notes and scales seem to elegantly dance around the deep sounds of the bass notes …show more content…
At the tender age of 10, Bach was orphaned. After the death of his parents, he was taken in by his brother where he was enrolled in school and continued his passion for music. Markedly influenced by an organist by the name of George Bohm, Bach became fluent in violin and harpsichord. He became a reputable musician and for a short time worked as an organist providing music for church services at the New Church in Arnstadt where he also taught music to children. The position didn’t last long as Bach was unable to get along with his pupils. Bach then acquired a position as an organist at the Church of St Blaise, in Muhlhausen. However, the complexity of Bach’s music was not welcomed by the church pastor and after one year the position …show more content…
As a result of the English Revolution under the direction of Oliver Cromwell, King Charles I was overthrown and the powerful republic regime that was suffocating the country’s economy was eradicated. Trade routes were established and the rise of the commonwealth began. This growth had a profound impact on artists, writers, musicians and architects of the period. Scientific discoveries challenged the resolve of the Catholic and Protestant Churches. Many philosophers of the time question religious ideals while some remained true to traditional theory. The grandeur and complexity of the era were unwelcome by some and many were reluctant of the

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