The Great Black Migration

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In general, the Great Black Migration took place from 1910 -1920 in which blacks were seeking a lifestyle other than the South and the Midwestern, Northern, and Eastern states became the land of opportunities. The Africans had suffered during slavery and segregation and spent their entire life working on plantations, but they realized the opportunity to work elsewhere gave them hope. The African Americans left the South for variety of reasons, firstly the low wages were a major factor in which the workers in the South were paid $.40 as a field hand and the workers in the North were paid $1.75 a day in some jobs (Mullane, 1993, p. 455). Secondly the North had become a hotbed for free slaves in which Chicago African American population increased …show more content…
In short, they knew by moving North this would provide the opportunity they have being dreaming of and allow them to put down the hoe, the mule straps and learned a new trade by working in the industries became. The African Americans had other reason to leave the South as they were facing an economic depression made the price of cotton to drop. Therefore, some farmers took a major financial hit because they had to sell their cotton at price lower than usual in which the farmers depended on cotton for a source of income. Furthermore, between 1915 and 1916, the farmers cotton “source of income” dried up with the devastation of the cotton crop b the boll weevil (Mullane, 1993, p. …show more content…
The war caused a need in factories in which required factories employers to seek more workers from the South as a way to hire cheap labor. The blacks would take the jobs the whites wouldn’t take because of the wages so, the fluctuation of people from the South increase in the North. The Northern employing factories also receive free advertisement about their jobs available as the Chicago Defender ran news articles, poems, and letters about the opportunities and was instrumental in spreading the word (Mullane, 1993, p. 456). The White Southerners opposed the newspaper and often times confiscated the newspaper. The paper was instrumental to counter the white southerners spreading rumors that the black migrants would face harsh climate conditions in the North and evening citing instances of death (Mullane, 1993, p.

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