Causes Of Social Phobia Essay

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Every day having to walk into a class, talk to people and even having to walk by them provokes me a strong fear that I cannot explain. Before presentations, meeting new people, and having to talk to a neighbor, classmate, or a relative always make me feel very afraid and when they talk to me, I blush, feel sweaty, and even tremble and that makes me more anxious and embarrassed. Writing, reading, and sometimes eating makes me feel embarrassed and I don’t like people looking at me at any time because it makes feel very uncomfortable and it’s like I’m being judge just by the fact they looked at me.
I have suffered from “extreme shyness” for so many years that people surrounding me find it normal and make no big deal about it. They take as if there was nothing wrong and just say that I’m very shy and boring because I don’t want to socialize and go out with anyone. I took it the same way;
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Social phobia is caused by a complex contribution of biological, environmental, and bad or traumatic experiences. When it comes to biological factor we know that anxiety can run in families, and this suggest that there’s a genes play a role. Secondly, people have different temperaments or personalities, which affect the degree to which they are easily distressed (Overcoming, 2008). The third and I believe the most important cause of social phobia is serotonin. A study done at Uppsala University show that individuals with social phobia make too much serotonin and the more serotonin they produce, the more anxious they are in social situations. Serotonin is produced in a part of the brain’s fear centre, the amygdala (Uppsala University, 2015) located in the brains temporal lobe and that’s where conditions such as anxiety, autism, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias are suspected of being linked to abnormal functioning of the amygdala, owing to damage, developmental problems, or neurotransmitter imbalance (Science Daily,

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