Kant's Ethical Theory Of Ethics

1177 Words 5 Pages
Name: Course: Title: Date: KANT’S GROUNDING FOR THE METAPHYSICS OF MORALS 1. Deontology is the view of the act to be moral or not moral from the action done. In deontology, the consequences that an action may impact to individuals are not considered but rather, the logic behind the action is determined. Consequences should not be used to justify the good in any action, “a good will is not good because of what it effects or accomplishes” (Ross 33). Such action should arise from the duty, and law assigned to individuals by a system but not out of self-interest or the consequences. According to Kant’s ethical theory, the inner principle of doing a specific action should be assessed through logical reasons rather than using measurable and practical …show more content…
The morality can be determined prior to the action. 2. Categorical imperative as used in Kant’s ethical theory is the tool which tries to eliminate the use of self-interest in deriving what we perceive to be moral. According to the categorical imperative, only actions which are done in fulfillment of duty are regarded to be moral but not action done from the motive of self-interest. From his view, any action done from self-interest are taken to be prudent rather than moral. Categorical imperative differed from the view of the maxim to greater extent. Maxim uses the majority and the practice of act to justify the morality even if the action goes against the right of others. According to Maxim, the morality of an action can only be determined by its practice. Assessing the consequences that may result from the action is key in such cases. Categorical imperative on the other hand demands that logical reasons are established before any action is taken. The inner principles of any form of acts should be considered rather than looking at the practicability of an action (Cherkasova 46). This is the principle upon which Kant’s’ ethical theory rely upon. …show more content…
He says, “The greatest happiness principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness” (Mill 52). Mill’s utilitarian ethical theory rely majorly on the self-interest rather performing an act as a duty. An ethical theory should have a reason justified for performing a specific act. The ability of an act to yield maximum happiness should not be used to determine whether the act is moral or immoral. It involves assessing what the people perceive to be moral and taking actions which will produce insignificant consequences on the people other than the individual performing the act. REGARDING EITHER THEORIST 6. As provided by Kant on his ethical theory, the standard of living an ethical life entails carrying out the logical reasoning behind the actions which are perceived to be moral. Kant argued that it is not a matter of following what the norm have stated to be moral but rather questioning the reason behind taking certain actions (Ross 37). Mill on the other hand in his utilitarian ethical theory based standards of living an ethical life on the ability of one to achieve maximum happiness from the

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