Case Study: The Tidal Model

1550 Words 6 Pages
“Life is a journey undertaken on an ocean of experience. All human development, including the experience of illness and health, involves discoveries made on the journey across that ocean of experience” (Barker, 2001a, p. 235). The Tidal Model theory was developed around water as its core metaphor, theorizing that human experiences, like water, are constantly in motion and always unpredictable (Barker, 2001a). Water resembles a force that can work against a person when in crisis by damaging their ship. However, once work is completed to repair their ship, water is available once again to set sail to the ship and guide it towards a new path in life (Barker, 2001a). Phil Barker’s work on The Tidal Model began in the late 1990s, and since then …show more content…
Consider Lena, a third year nursing student completing her mental health rotation with an assertive community treatment team. Lena accompanies a caseworker to visit a client with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Violet, the client, is experiencing vivid hallucinations of angels and demons who physically attack her, make negative comments about her, and encourage her to drink excessive amounts of alcohol. Violet is taking numerous medications for her illness. Despite her compliance with the medication regimen, she is not experiencing any relief in the severity of her symptoms. During the visit, the case manager makes a proposal that Violet should voluntarily admit herself to a psychiatric hospital and thus have the opportunity to start a brand new medication regimen. Violet seems open to the idea until her mother, Evelyn, enters the room. Evelyn is evidently frustrated and stressed from constantly caring for Violet. Her agitation and lack of patience have an immediate effect on Violet, who becomes tearful and feels as though her mother is forcing her to be admitted to the hospital. Evelyn scolds Violet, telling her that being admitted to the hospital is the only option she …show more content…
By using the Tidal Model as a guideline, they could begin by focusing on the world dimension of the model in order to achieve a better picture of Violet’s wants and needs. The world dimension requires that the client share their thoughts, feelings, and beliefs with the healthcare provider in order to foster understanding through holistic care (Clan Unity Ltd., 2000). Barker outlines ten important factors for achieving this goal with the client. These factors include: discovery of the origin of the problem, past problem function, past emotional context, developmental history, relationships, current emotional context, holistic content of the client’s view, holistic content of client’s self-concept, the client’s needs, wants and wishes, and the client’s expectations (Barker, 2001c). This part of the assessment would serve to give Lena and the caseworker a better understanding of what Violet’s challenges are in regards to managing her schizophrenia, and what problems she feels arise because of it. By completing a biopsychosocial assessment on Violet and establishing therapeutic communication with her, the healthcare providers would take a step towards helping her reclaim control of her

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