Case Study: The Ethical Decision Of Dr. Green

Superior Essays
Position Paper 1:
The Ethical Decision of Dr. Green
Dr. Joy Green is a Psychologist that crossed the line of professional ethics with her client, Ava Jones. A personal relationship was formed and Dr. Green did not make ethically responsible decisions based on the Code of Ethics and Ethical Principle Screen. The ethical codes and principles were created to assist health service workers in forming the most ethical decision that works for the client. The code of ethics for the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) would disagree with the way Dr. Green handled the situation. In particular, it is evident that her decision to keep Ava in the classroom violated the ethical responsibility to one’s client. To clarify, it violated the conflict
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Green is still familiar with Ava’s case. Green can no longer remain objective in her work. It would then be a dual relationship with the client where you have a professional and social relationship. Health care workers should not engage in any form of dual relationship with clients, or formal clients as there are increase risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client (NASW, 2018, 1.06c conflict of interest). Another type of dual relationship is a sexual relationship between the therapist and the client. This kind of relationship is very dangerous because there is a power imbalance within the relationship. At first glance, it is a relationship between two consenting adults, but that is never the case due to the power play. Furthermore, the client is vulnerable and sharing intimate secrets and emotions with the therapist leaving them feeling like victims, which may intensify his or her mental health (good therapy, …show more content…
Green did not make the right decision in this case. Ethical principle four focuses on causing the least harm, it states that “when faced with options that have the potential for causing harm, a social worker should attempt to avoid these” (Dolgoff, Harrington & Loewenberg, 2012 p. 82). In the end, Dr. Green did not evaluate the different options that could have caused the least harm. For instance, she could have talked to someone with a higher position to referral her to another class or Psychologist. Ethical principle seven states, “a social worker should make practice decisions that permit her to speak the truth and to fully disclose all relevant information to her client and to others” (Dolgoff et al., 2012 p. 82). There came a point in the case, because of Dr. Green’s decision to keep Ava in the class she was not able or willing to speak the truth with Ava as she was concerned that she was not stable

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