Music Therapy Case Study

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Music is often used to improve the lives of many people. People often listen to music to take away stress and make their lives happier. Humans like to enjoy the feeling of comfort and the sense of security - the feelings that bring people pleasure. But the question is: How can music help recover sick patients through psychotherapy? This is an important topic to study because music can improve the recovery of patients in many ways. It can reduce pain after surgery to make the pain more bearable. Patients who have psychological disorders can also ease their symptoms through music therapy (Kemper, Kathi J., and Suzanne C. Danhauer). In a music therapy case study, a man named Jerry has lived with mental health problems for approximately twenty …show more content…
For instance, they have conducted interviews with a patient, the patient’s mother, and the child’s therapist. The researchers both have to analyze the different viewpoints using music therapy. They want the adults to describe their experience with the music therapy and how their experience can better shape the process for the child patients. A psychologist has interviewed the child using a coding procedure (an interview with the child patient which can then be deciphered to interpret the child’s needs). Then, the data from the interview has gotten reorganized to figure out the actual psychosocial needs (compared with how music therapy can show improvement). Repetition of the process is crucial in order to find out other needs such as cultural needs and developmental needs. This process shows that music therapy can reduce psychosocial flashbacks that occur during BMT (bone marrow transplant) admission. Music therapy provides a stable connection between a child and the child’s family. The strength of the child’s close relationships are proven by self-recognition. As a result, the child can become more confident and happy (O 'Neill, N., and M. …show more content…
Different researchers have presented the fact that many sessions of music therapy use qualitative research to find out more about a patient. Unlike quantitative research, which directly states the truth, the patient’s needs are proven in multiple ways. Interpreting the patient’s situation can allow the therapist to connect the patient’s past experience with quantitative hypotheses. This diagnosis would help the therapist to determine how to treat the patient. Music therapists are then able to draw an obvious pattern from interview sessions with the patient. This allows them to recognize and better explain the patient’s disorder (Brown, C. J., A. C. N. Chen, and S. F.

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