Lunatic Asylum Experience

Superior Essays
My initial thoughts about Trans Allegheny Lunatic Asylum(TALA) before our visit was that “It is a museum or institutions that describes mental illnesses, and how to describe or diagnose people who had mental problems.” Prior to coming to pharmacy school, I was oblivious about mental maladies. I recalled back in Nigeria, there was a song called “kolomental”. But I was too young to fully comprehend what the song meant. I did not have any idea that there are people who suffer from mental illnesses in a large group of people. There are groups of people who suffer from mental illness on a daily basis. I was astonished that there is a large institution that was built for people who suffer from insanity. The institution is an enormous brick layered building influenced by Thomas Kirkbride. All of the patients, Doctors, Nurses, and workers that were …show more content…
This is a surgical procedure that involving an incision in prefrontal lobe of the brain used to treat mental illness. Lobotomy is used to treat anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. It was thought to be an effective treatment, but with the advancement of technology proves that It is not an effective way to treat patient because it made the individual more docile and agreeable but did nothing to treat the mental illness. Moreover, this lobotomy procedure was very inhumane procedure.
Moreover, with medical advances Prescriptions has changed how mental illness is treated because in the late nineteenth century individuals that had mental problems were separated from the society. However, the medications that are given nowadays are much better to help patients cope with everyday society. The problem is that our society has made it a norm that the patients has to conform to the society, but I feel like we have to be able to accommodate the patient and tolerate them. It is a great feeling knowing people can relate to

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