Reconciliation In Northern Ireland Essay

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Historical case studies in reconciliation.
Background to the Northern Ireland conflict
After getting its independence from Britain, Ireland remained united with England, Wales as well as Scotland. When talking of the conflict in Northern Ireland, the division between Catholics and Protestants cannot be omitted. Historically, the Irish nation is a catholic nation. However, the citizens in North Ireland have ancestors who were Protestant immigrants from England and Scotland. Therefore, the conflict stems up as a result of a split population with differing cultures and religions. The north wanted to remain united with Britain while the Catholics stirred up and the disagreement threw the nation into a civil war (Phoenix and Eamon 19). Finally, Ireland was liberated but remained divided into two and even up to date, the situation has remained unresolved. This is because the Catholics want Ireland to be united as one and exit from the union with England, Scotland and Wales, whereas Protestants want to remain united with UK.
The most enduring challenge to reconciliation in Northern Ireland conflict
Reconciliation in the Northern Ireland has been difficult
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It may seem unique to some extent because it appears to be more of a religious conflict than a political conflict. Most nations face political conflicts and this challenge may not necessary occur but regardless, the North Ireland conflict is a political conflict intertwined within religion. This challenge may also not be common in all reconciliation process because the seclusion in Ireland makes even children who are born to grow with the hatred towards each other and passed on from generation to generation which makes it even harder to mitigate. In other words, this conflict may be termed as “inborn” unlike other conflicts which arise from

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