Essay On Osteoarthritis

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Introduction: This report will be talking about osteoarthritis in the Waitemata district. It includes the epidemiology of osteoarthritis (OA) and its biological changes, the health needs associated with osteoarthritis in the Waitemata district health board population, and a policy and service that is involved in reducing the health need. OA is one of the most common types of arthritis and is a degenerative joint disease. It is a leading cause of pain and disability problems for middle to elderly people (Hunter & Felson, 2006). The deterioration of the joint is caused by a process which involves the continuous loss of articular cartilage (Buckwalter & Martin, 2006).
Section 1: Epidemiology of health condition and biological changes
a) The extent and distribution of the health condition in NZ with specified comparisons

Over 530,000 New Zealanders aged 15 or over in 2010 are living with at least one type of arthritis. This is approximately 15.2% of the total population aged 15 or over. Over half are female and 9.4% of the people that have arthritis are of Maori descent. Prevalence rates in elderly age groups are alike because of the influence of OA. OA affects a total of 11.6% of non-Maori women out of the total 18% that are
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An individual’s environment and social context may be relevant to arthritis prevalence and health outcomes. Income is likely to affect health as money is needed to gain access to healthier and better environments, commodities and services, an increased income and wealth allows access to more or higher quality health-promoting resources (Cleveland et al, 2012). Also a lower level of education and living in an area that has a greater rate of household poverty has been shown to be connected with the risk of knee osteoarthritis; the causes could be because of less access to clinics, safe public transport options and safer places to exercise (Cleveland et al,

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