Goodwe Fitness Case Study

1914 Words 8 Pages
1. As the Fitness Class Coordinator at GoodLife Fitness, I have been informed that there has been some recent male interest in the dance classes that are held in the facilities co-ed sections. In order to attract men into the GoodLife’s co-ed dance programs, I will be initiating two marketing campaigns in hopes of attracting more men into classes. The objective of both marketing campaigns will not be to make profit, but instead to solve the issue (Crompton,2002) of men not feeling our dance programs are inclusive, as well as to increase the amount of male participants in the co-ed dance classes offered. The first marketing campaign will be posters. Posters are a great way to grab individuals’ attention, an easy way to spread information and …show more content…
The second marketing campaign I will put in place is a contest. Every member of GoodLife Fitness will be emailed the details of the contest and although this contest will attract both males and females, it will be of great interest to men because men typically enjoy contests and competition. The email will explain that every member that attends more than five dance classes will be entered to win a free one-year membership as well as a GoodLife hoodie, gym bag, water bottle and protein powder. If there is a prize involved, men will be more encouraged to attend the five dance classes in hopes of winning the prize and if they enjoy dancing, they will hopefully continue to attend the classes. In the end these marketing campaigns will be used to communicate with our stakeholders (Keefe,2004), which in this case are the male members of GoodLife Fitness, and as a result of communicating and then delivering inclusive dance programming, GoodLife will be able to build and maintain positive customer relationships with our male members (Kaczynski, 2008), which will ultimately benefit both GoodLife Fitness and its …show more content…
Men may be more constrained than women when it comes to leisure activity selection because of the stereotypical views and expectations of masculinity society holds, leading them to feel as if they cannot participate in non-stereotypical activities such as dance (Shaw,2013). It has been proven that many men are less likely to participate in non-stereotypical activities because they think society will see them as “weak” and not very masculine (Hardin & Greer,2009). Also, since Title IX, a right that reduces sex discrimination is sport and education (Hardin & Greer, 2009), women have generally had more freedom in choosing whatever sport they want to participate with being differentiated but men still struggle with feeling that they have the freedom to participate in any activity they want without feeling any less “masculine” (Hardin & Greer, 2009). Two specific constraints to leisure participation that men face are intrapersonal constraints and interpersonal constraints. An intrapersonal constraint is a psychological state that allows one to believe that an activity in “inappropriate or “uninteresting” (Scott, 1991). Men clients at GoodLife fitness may be actually be interested in activities such as dance, however if for example, a dance studio is very feminine and only offers ballet and jazz classes, men may think that they are not interested in participating in dance at all because they are not motivated to participate in ballet and find it inappropriate to be in a room

Related Documents