Case Study Of Bulimia Nervosa

785 Words 4 Pages
The patient , JA, is showing symptoms related to Bulimia Nervosa (BN). According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, 5th edition or the DSM-5 , JA’s eating disorder has disrupted her everyday life (DSM-5, American Psychiatric Association, 2013). People who are diagnosed with Bulimia usually experience similar symptoms that have common features that correspond to the DSM-5 's description of this disorder. Criteria A: Recurrent episodes of binge eating where excessive amounts of food are consumed in a small amounts of time and during the episode a sense of lack of control is experienced. Criteria B: Recurrent compensatory behaviors in order to lose weight such as self-induced vomiting; misuse of laxatives, diuretics …show more content…
Several symptoms in Criteria A are exhibited by JA. For example JA would ate large amounts of unhealthy food in a short period of time. She reported that the she was totally out of control during these binges and felt as if she could not stop eating or control the amounts of food she was eating. Criteria B is shown through JB’s inappropriate compensatory behaviors of purging and fasting. She restricted her food intake and purged her food by sticker her fingers down her throat to make herself vomit. According to JB’s clinical history. she started her eating disorder at age 13, thus supporting Criteria C. Criteria D is shown through JB’s self evalution of herself. She often considered that she weighed to much and had a negative body image. JB also reported having poor self-esteem. JB’s disturbance does not occur exclusively during episodes of Anorexia Nervosa. JB is in partial remission and has a moderate case of Bulimia due to the average number of episodes of inappropriate compensatory behaviors per …show more content…
According to her clinical history JB comes from an abusive home background. A study found that eating disorder are caused by multiple factors (Mond, Hay, Rodgers, Owen, & Beaumont, 2013). This study examined the beliefs women had concerning possible causes of eating disorders (Mond et., 2013). Their study found that , “problems from childhood”, including sexual abuse and being overweight, portrayal of the ‘ideal’ body weight and shape in the media, and low self-esteem’, were the factors most often judged to be causes of eating disorder. Another article suggested that eating disorders are caused by an individual 's low levels of perceived self control Dalgeish et al. (2001). This study investigated the role perceived control played in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa. The results of their study suggest that people with eating disorders exhibit a “depressive attributional style” of internal and stable attributions for negative events that take place (Dalgeish et al.

Related Documents