Case Study Of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

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Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) has become a major treatment approach that has been developed and deemed effective for working with individuals addicted to or abuse alcohol. Alcohol Anonymous (AA) was spearheaded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith and was officially started in May 1935. Both Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith recognized that sobriety could be attained or maintained through supporting others and themselves. Spiritual beliefs involved in AA were derived from the Oxford Group, which Bill Wilson was a part of. Most Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) meetings are held in church halls or basements where groups are at no cost and are considered community-based resources for individuals in need (Straussner, 2013). Individuals who once struggle with alcohol …show more content…
“Sponsorship is a mutually beneficial relationship in which a long term member provides support and advice to the comer” (Straussner, 2013, p.276). A variety of groups for substance use disorders were designed, implemented and copied the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) model. These programs were geared towards providing individuals with substance use disorders an alternative to loneliness, shame and isolation they often time experience while providing them with insight, connection to a higher power and taking responsibility for their actions. Among the major groups that were developed and designed are; Narcotics Anonymous, Cocaine Anonymous, Marijuana Anonymous, Crystal Meth Anonymous, Heroin Anonymous and Al-Anon Family …show more content…
He often time went a bit off track while sharing and looked at the clock during his presentation as though he was trying not to finish his presentation too quickly. He abused alcohol and also started using heroin. He described his wife and two children coming to his work after not hearing from him for several hours and calling his cell phone repeatedly. His wife and children saw him while he was about to insert the needle in his arm. He yelled at them and told them to leave him alone and go home. He recalled how hurt he felt when he finally recognized what he had done. He felt justified drinking because he was never pulled over or got involved in an accident after abusing alcohol. Todd’s wife also started abusing substances and both tried to be good parents at the same time. He finally snapped one night when it was his turn to sleep and the children were up and making noises that woke him up. He picked his wife up by the neck and placed her against the wall, threatening to kill her and the cops intervened. He received counseling and attended a treatment program. Today he works and is currently assisting counselors that work with individuals with substance use

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