Brexit In The UK

Good Essays
Furat Fakhreddin
Academic Skills
Assignment 1

Brexit is the abbreviation of Britain and Exit and it refers to a referendum vote that took place on the 23rd of March 2016 where the public voted that the United Kingdom was to exit the European Union. The leave vote won with 51.9% of the vote . This was first initiated by the UK Independence party. They pushed for the UK to leave the EU and in recent years gained the support of conservative party’s MP’s. They argue that being an EU member effected many businesses due to the many rules and regulation that the EU imposed on them. They also argued that the UK needed to take back control of its borders in order to gain back control over immigration . Law making was also another issue that
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Since the Human Rights Act is based upon the ECHR this means that all member states enrolled in the ECHR including the U.K now have access to cases heard and verdicts given in the European Court of Human Rights. This allows for the courts in the U.K to have a point of reference if a case is heard that relates to one already tried in the European Court of Human Rights. The Human Rights Act also protects it citizens from the government by setting two absolute rights. The right to life in the Human Rights Act is an absolute right meaning that there are no exceptions to this right. The right to life ensures that the government cannot try to end your life and that the government should introduce laws that protect life. This can be seen in the case of Pretty v United Kingdom. The Human Rights Act also makes Freedom from torture and inhuman or degrading treatment an absolute act. This protects citizens from torture form the government and the government must protect you from torture and Inhumane treatment from others. This can be seen in the case of Chahal v United …show more content…
The main purpose of the Bill of Rights is to break the formal link between the judiciary and the ECHR. The Bill of Rights will now allow the judiciary to have the final say in human rights cases instead of the ECHR which will give the judiciary more power. This will also give the judiciary the power to interpret cases relating to human rights essentially re-writing the common law themselves instead of relying on Strasbourg’s case law. Comparing the Bill of Rights to the Human Rights Act will show some of the core difference between the two. The Bill of Rights will take into consideration traditional and constitutional rights that the Human Rights Act does not such as, the right to a trial by jury, and the right to free speech all of which are not protected under the Human Rights Act. The Human Rights Act was drafted on the basis on the ECHR which was made to protect the rights of people in the E.U and other surrounding nations thus, it does not take into consideration the tradition and values of the U.K alone. The bill of rights aims to solve this

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