Carl's Jr.: Gender Stereotypes In Advertising

1400 Words 6 Pages
“[Carl’s Jr. advertisements] are really more like soft porn rather than food promotions” (Bisbing). This may seem like a gross exaggeration, but unfortunately, it isn’t far from the truth. The Carl’s Jr. franchise is infamous for portraying women as purely sexual objects through advertisements in order to make their burgers look better. ‘Sex sells’ is possibly the most common excuse for this type of advertising, though humans don’t naturally crave sex in the form of a 30-second commercial idealizing a dangerously underfed model. This is a lesson the media repeatedly teaches to the masses that contributes to sexist ideologies that are harmful to people of all genders, not only women. Carl’s Jr. uses grotesquely hypersexualized advertisements …show more content…
Story). Some of the most famous models and actresses in the world have followed in suit after Paris Hilton, including Heidi Klum, Kate Upton, Jenny McCarthy, and Kim Kardashian. By using these women for purely their bodies, rarely even allowing them a single line in commercials, Carl’s Jr. takes away these women’s individuality and humanity, thoroughly objectifying them; “This is detrimental to society because the media is creating social stereotypes for both men and women that can result in unhealthy social and physical habits” (Barber). We as individuals have a deep desire to fit in and feel wanted. Media like this blatantly shows women how to be wanted, which is to be mindless and flawless, apparently. However, this is deleterious to men, as …show more content…
“Lexie and Lindsay Kite...both have PhDs in the study of media and body image and run the non-profit Beauty Redefined” (NBC). Beauty Redefined targets advertisers like Carl’s Jr., often calling for reform in the honorable quest to raise the self esteem of young women in the first world. “[Beauty Redefined] say[s] that Carl’s Jr. portraying women as they do in this manner reinforces the idea that they are objects to be viewed for sexual pleasure only, their worth is tied solely in how they look and how sexual they can act” (Non-Profit). This isn’t a healthy campaign for anybody involved. To dehumanize an entire gender in order to increase profits is proof of the media’s detachment from reality. Beauty Redefined claims “health problems such as decreased self-esteem, depression, anxiety, decreased cognitive function and eating disorders are common effects of a woman being devalued as a whole being.” Rewrite Beautiful, an organization aiming to battle eating disorders, claims that “50% of teenage girls...use unhealthy weight control behaviors such as skipping meals, fasting, smoking cigarettes, vomiting, and taking laxatives” (Eating). Teenage girls should be concerned with who they want to be when they grow up, not how they don’t

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