Person Centred Theory

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The person-centred theory developed by Carl Rogers (1902-87), is also known as ‘client-centred or the ‘Rogerian’ approach. It wasn’t until after 1945 when the war was coming to an end that the person-centred approach became well known as a non-medical approach and the main form of counselling in the USA. It aims to help a client fulfil their unique potential and become their own person. The process is non-directive, reflective and experiential, the process is prompted by three core conditions held by the therapist; unconditional positive regard, empathy and congruence (Dryden, 2014) On the other hand pathology refers to the study of unusual, distressing and dysfunctional psychological conditions (Joseph and Worsley, 2005). The medical model …show more content…
Carl Rogers (2003). He established this approach to counselling and psychotherapy that was believed really essential if not revolutionary. Initially explained as non-directive, this therapy moved away from the view that the therapist was the skilled and about a theory that believed the intrinsic approach (identified as the actualising approach) of people to observe success of their individual potentials. An essential aspect of this theory is that in a considerable psychological context, the accomplishment of personal potentials comprises sociability, the demand to be with other people and a wish to understand and be recognised through other human beings. It also comprises being open to observe, being trustworthy, and being inquisitive regarding the world, being compassionate and creative (Joyce, and Sills, …show more content…
“Congruence refers to the internal, relational and ecological integration of persons. It is a broad-based construct that describes who we are and who we may become” (Seeman, 2001:211). Congruence is the level of therapist’s self-awareness, openness, integrity and genuineness. Rogers first introduced congruence in his personality theory, referring to the consistency between the ideal self and the self (Rogers, 1995). Rogers also emphasises that the therapists symbolisation of his/her own experience must be accurate in order for an effective therapy, for example he must accurately be himself in the relationship. The process towards becoming congruent includes experience, awareness and accurately being himself (Cooper, 2007). Being genuine was connected to the ‘realness’ of the therapist’s interest in the individual, it is embodied in the attitude of warmth and understanding towards the client in order to be effective (Bozarth, 1998). Self-concept and experience are only congruent if they match up exactly to each other and if the self-concept accurately represents the experience. Therefore, congruence is then the accurate symbolisation of experience, experience is “all that is going on within the envelope of the organism at any given moment which is potentially available to awareness” (Purton, 2004, pg46).

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