Carl Rogers Client Centered Model

1349 Words 6 Pages
Carl Rogers and Fredrick Perls both developed useful psychotherapy techniques that have similar goals. However, the two types of therapy pursue this outcome in dissimilar ways. Carl Rogers’ client centered model focuses on the relationship with the client in the hopes that building a genuine relationship will allow the client to explore attitudes and emotions more deeply. Or, in other words, examine hidden aspects that are recalled remotely but are not being experienced by the client in the present time. Perls’ Gestalt model is attempting to do the same, bringing the client to experience the conflict in the present and any attempt to ‘escape’ to the past or future is seen as resistance. However, in stark contrast with client centered therapy, …show more content…
Of coarse, for this to be effective the relationship may not be any less then purely genuine. Again, feeling prized by the therapist the client may prize themselves. Once feelings on this level are established changes in expressions are observable. The client now recalls their conflicts in a more immediate fashion. They are no longer being regurgitated from their remote memory, they are experiencing their problem first hand, in the present. Now, the client has made themselves vulnerable to the therapist and yet remains comfortable. The therapist responds in a way that is appropriate and accepting of the clients conundrum leaving the client with the idea that discussion may be conducted …show more content…
However, it is an effective model. The problem that I have with this model is that since the client is intentionally put in an uncomfortable position they may not want to continue their therapy. But an in-expendable model nonetheless, Gestalt may be the only option for people with severe trust issues leaving confrontation the only way of accessing inner distress. Client centered therapy, I feel, is a more versatile option because more people will respond to this therapy positively. Also, due to the subtlety of this technique the results may be less influenced by the manner in which the client arrives at them. These therapies have in common the goal of accessing inner conflict by surpassing the defensive nature of the client. One technique asks for access and the other uses bolt cutters. Once past this barrier the client is left alone to form

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